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Pages:
4 pages/≈1100 words
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Level:
MLA
Subject:
Literature & Language
Type:
Movie Review
Language:
English (U.S.)
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Assessment Of Gay African Lesbian Movies Moonlight (Movie Review Sample)

Instructions:

Assessment of gay African lesbian movies Moonlight
Instructions: Using the guide to writing Evaluations on pages 197-205 of The Norton Field Guide, write an evaluation of any “text,” broadly defined (book, film, television show, video game, music recording or performance, etc.). In order to ensure that you are writing an evaluation essay (and not a book report, plot summary, or something else), please incorporate all five of the key features of evaluative essay writing into your project (refer to pages 201-202, as well as any notes you took when we reviewed those pages in class).
Remember to be sensitive to your audience and to your purpose. In other words, keep in mind that evaluative writing exists to assist readers in making their own decisions about what texts are worthy of their limited free time and / or limited spending money. You are not simply sharing your opinions. Instead, you are thinking and writing critically and analytically about your responses to a text in ways that will help readers predict whether that text is likely to have value for them. Also remember that you are writing an academic essay, so your tone and style should be appropriately formal. Do not write an informal consumer review that might appear on a website. Do not write a piece of review journalism that might appear in a magazine or a culture website. Refer to the Ali Heinekamp essay on pages 198-201 (and your notes from our in-class work on the same) for a strong example of an undergraduate academic evaluation essay.
It will be close to impossible to fulfill key feature #3 (“a knowledgeable discussion of the subject”) without drawing upon outside sources. Many of you will also want to work with passages / scenes / excerpts from the text that you're evaluating. Be sure to cite all use of sources using the MLA guidelines we reviewed in class. This means using in-text citations and a Works Cited page to fully cite all quotations, paraphrases, and summaries. I cannot tell you how many sources to use, but I can remind you to make sure that your voice remains dominant—do not use so many sources or rely so heavily upon them that your own voice disappears beneath the voices of your sources. Be sure to format all papers according to MLA guidelines as well. Refer as necessary to the citation guidelines on pages 503-537, the formatting guidelines on pages 538-539, and the sample MLA paper on pages 540-548. If you do not have the correct edition of the textbook (the one with the 2016 MLA update), you will not have the correct citation and formatting guidelines.

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Moonlight Film Evaluation
The central conflict in Moonlight revolves around how Chiron tires to discover love and the human connection. The film is a brilliantly acted meticulously crafted and vibrantly shot coming-of-age masterpiece that focuses on portraying the story of a young African American gay child, growing up in a poverty-stricken neighborhood in Miami (Lee 1). As queer as it is black, the film directed by Barry Jenkins now finds itself teetering on the edge of becoming the first LGBT film to win a significant Academy award. Audiences only need to remember how heterosexual stereotypes can become a barrier to even the most accessible queer love stories.
In the society, gay culture has been shamed for many decades. Sexual positivity now dominates same-sex relationships, and the community now values honesty and confidence in most sex scenes in films (Lee 1). Increasingly, this has been seen in television and also films that have been made with a feature that sets its sights mainly on mass appeal. Furthermore, such movies glorify heterosexual relationships in which leads to the community growing timid over LGBT films (Lee 2).
The motif of outside versus inside creates a significant dichotomy in the film. This is associated with the manner that Moonlight takes an individual's appearance and the relationship to what a person carries on the inside as its subject. Throughout his life, Chiron remains profoundly silent in the film, and he only reveals his true self in most heartbreaking admissions (Lee 5). Such moments are highly significant for gay individuals as they have to remain silent of their true identity since they feel embarrassed of revealing their true self to others. Although Chiron is a hardened criminal on the outside, he later admits to Kevin that he never was touched by anyone since their moonlight tryst as teenagers (Lee 5).
Moonlight efficiently veers away from the literary stereotypes that its entire settings may suggest. This film intentionally rejects what the viewer may anticipate in such a deep storyline. The concept of male weakness and strength is essential to Moonlight's exploration of the identity of Chiron and also the cultural forces that mold it. This holds true since Chiron's journey into manhood circulates his sense of his weakness within a society that continually demands toughness from him (Cuby 10).
Juan eventually makes the realization that Chiron does not need to be coddled or forced into opening up emotionally. All that Chiron needed was space and time to express himself. At every juncture and interactions between Chiron and Juan, Juan attempts to dissuade the boy from accepting whatever fate has been handed to him by his tormentors including his drug-addicted mother Paula (Sims 4).
The pacing of the film is sequential as it is highlighted in three stages. In one of the scenes, the young Chiron asks Juan on what the word “faggot “means. Juan answers that this word is only utilized by people to make gay individuals feel insecure or negative about their identity (Thrasher 18). Chiron then inquires on whether Juan is gay and Juan assures the young boy that a person could be gay, but there are no justifications for being called a "faggot." This is a significant moment in the film as it attempts to dismantle the assertion that all African American males especially those from poverty-stricken neighborhoods are homophobic (Cuby 9).
In regards to cyclical identity, t

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