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Reflection paper for a social work class Social Sciences Essay (Essay Sample)

Instructions:

This is an assignment for a social work class. Please note that social work is not sociology.
The class is called human behavior in social environment. I’ve attached the syllabus and please take a quick look before you start writing,
This assignment title is “ emotions: what makes you happy, sad, motivated and angry?”
In this assignment you will write about what makes you have the following emotions: happy, sad, motivated and angry. Then summarize and analyze your emotions based on some social work theory: for example: Freud’s landmark work/ psychodynamic theory.( you can easily find these theory online)
I’ve already write down my emotions( see attached) , so you will be writing this two-page summary and reflection work based on what I wrote.
Let me know if you have any questions!
There is one file that is not uploaded yet and I will upload it with in 10 mins

 

COURSE OVERVIEW

 

Human Behavior in the Social Environment II is centered in the bio-psycho-social approach, which stresses a multi-dimensional view of human development and behavior. This perspective views the person in the context of the environment, and takes into consideration the challenges, stressors and life tasks that occur throughout the life cycle. The course stresses the centrality of culture, race, ethnicity, gender and the socioeconomic environment. Using ecological systems theory as a critical theoretical underpinning, Human Behavior in the Social Environment II stresses a non-linear view of development in which there is a continuous reciprocal interchange and mutual impact among different systems (individual, family, group, community). A major focus of the course is on development of the human biological, psychological and social structure as it occurs throughout the life span. Human Behavior in the Social Environment II draws upon the approaches studied in HBSE I, and continues the study of adolescence through old age. The social realities of the urban environment and immigration are emphasized. Critical thinking is stimulated through questioning the different assumptions and gaps in developmental theory, as well as ways to incorporate emerging research in the quest to expand the social work knowledge base. The linkages of theories to practice interventions, prevention and policy implications are also considered.

 

The focus is on the continuing evolution and expression of personal and social identity in the stages of the life cycle from early adolescence through old age. Concepts from ego psychology and social science that relate to various aspects of normal development, integration, and socialization in later life are examined, as well as theories of stress and crisis. The impact of social structure and processes on individual, familial, and work roles over time is emphasized throughout.

 

By the end of the course, students will be able to demonstrate the following competencies:

 

  1. Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice Apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference in shaping life experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels.

 

  1. Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities.

Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies.

 

  1. Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations and Communities

Collect and organize data, and apply critical thinking to interpret information from clients and constituencies. Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies. 

 

 

  1. Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies.

 

  1. Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies.

 

Faculty Adherences and Special Accommodations

 

All instructors adhere to University and School policies regarding accommodations for students with disabilities, religious holidays, incomplete grades, and plagiarism. Students requesting accommodations due to disability issues must register with the Moses Center for Students with Disabilities (address: 726 Broadway, 2nd floor; phone: 212-998-4980; web: www.nyu.edu/csd). An accommodation letter listing approved accommodations will be generated by the Moses Center and given to the student, who must deliver the letter to the professor before accommodations can be used in any course. We request that students provide the accommodation letters to the appropriate professor as early as possible in the semester so that accommodations can be arranged.

 

Expectations

 

  1. Assigned readings.

Students are expected to do all of the required readings in advance of each class. You may be called on during class to share your comments, observations, and questions for discussion. Students are also encouraged to read any recommended reading, particularly those that apply to your areas of interest or practice. Remember you can expect to get out of class as much as you put into the class.

 

  1. Attendance.

Students are expected to attend all classes, to arrive on time, and be prepared to contribute to the group learning process. NOTE: Students are expected to contact (via e-mail) if, for some reason, they are not able to attend class. They are responsible for keeping up with their readings and other assignments.

 

  1. Class Participation.

You are strongly encouraged ask questions and express your views in class. Indeed, class participation and in-class dialogue and exchange are essential components of the learning process for this course. You are required to respect other points of view and treat your fellow classmates with respect. Class participation is 20% of your grade. Participation includes an appropriate balance of talking and listening, willingness to take risks in asking questions, and sharing observations and experiences.

 

  1. Laptops are permitted solely for the purpose of note-taking. Please do not use laptops to check email, Facebook, surf the Web, work on assignments, etc. This is disrespectful to the instructor and distracting to other students near you.

 

NYU email. It is expected that students will check their NYU email accounts and NYU Classes regularly for course updates, new material, and announcements.

 

Course and Faculty Instructors Evaluations

Student feedback regarding the course is strongly encouraged throughout the semester. Students will be asked to complete a formal course evaluation.

 

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

 

By the end of the semester students will develop:

 

VALUES:

  1. An evolving understanding of the impact and context of diversity on human behavior with special emphasis on the influences of culture, race, gender, disabilities, immigration status, sexual orientation and economic status.
  2. An understanding of social work values, particularly how diversity shapes the human experience, relationships between people and their environments, and the formation of identity.
  3. A robust respect for individual worth, human dignity and the range of human diversity founded in the values and ethics of the profession.

 

KNOWLEDGE:

  1. An understanding of the foundation of social work knowledge and theory, including but not limited to:
    1. generalist social work principles
    2. systems theory
    3. ecological perspectives
    4. strengths-based, collaborative and empowerment theories.
    5. An understanding of the human life cycle and how various theories apply to differing phases.
    6. A knowledge base of the social-environmental conditions that promote or impede human behavior and agency, i.e., privilege, poverty, violence, classism, racism, oppression and discrimination and acknowledge the imperative to promote economic and social justice.
    7. An understanding of relationships among the individual, family, group, community, environment and organizations, and understanding how these systems interact to contextualize human behavior.

 

SKILLS:

  1. Beginning skills in reflecting on the impact of the environment on the individual in time and place and the reciprocal influence of the person on various systems in the environment.
  2. Beginning skills in assessing human behavior from a holistic perspective, including broader

sociocultural, community, familial, and intrapsychic factors.

  1. The ability to map systems of influence on human behavior using genograms, ecomaps, and timelines.

 

 

 

 

 

Students will use the values, knowledge, and skills above to: 

 

BEHAVIORS:

 

  1. Understand the importance of the relationships among the individual, family, group, organization and community, and consider the transactions among these different systems, which provide the context for behavior through the life course.
  2. Recognize the range, significance and strengths of diversity within different human and environmental systems, with specific attention paid to the influences of culture, race, class, gender, sexual orientation and disability on human behavior.
  3. Critically appraise the strengths, limitations and value biases of different theoretical paradigms

used to understand human behavior.

  1. Use research studies to understand the impact of specific forces on human behavior and interaction, and to critically evaluate existing theories and their implicit and explicit values
  2. Integrate the values and the ethics of the profession including respect for individual worth, human dignity and the range of human diversity.

 

 

COURSE FORMAT

 

This course will meet one a week for two hours and forty-five minutes each week, with a 15-minute break. Classes will use a variety of modalities including lecture, discussion, class exercises, guest speakers, small group work, audiovisual materials, role-playing, and case study analysis. Activities will focus on developing a working knowledge of social work theories as they apply to diverse populations, presenting problems, and environments.

 

REQUIRED COURSE TEXT AND READINGS

 

Students are expected to do all of the required readings in advance of each class and be prepared to discuss your thoughts about them. Students are also required to read all materials assigned throughout the course such as weekly assigned journal articles, New York Times articles, book chapters, etc. You are also encouraged to do the recommended reading, particularly when relevant to your specific area of interest.

  1. Students will be asked verbally and in writing to express their understanding of the terms, theories, and concepts discussed in each class.  This is not a quiz, but a method of informing the instructor as to whether class discussions are meeting the desired objectives.
  2. Students will be asked to identify and bring to discussion articles from the New York Times with particular relevance to the terms, theories, and concepts discussed in class. Each class will open with an opportunity to share these stories. Again this is not a graded assignment but will count towards your class participation grade.

 

 

 

REQUIRED TEXTS:

  • Rogers, A. T. (2016). Human Behavior in the Social Environment: Perspectives on Development, the Life Course. Routledge.
  • Hutchison, E. (2015). Dimensions of human behavior: Person and Environment.                Washington, DC: Sage Publication
  • Desmond, M. (2016). Evicted: Poverty and profit in the American city. Broadway books.
  • Harding, D. J. (2010). Living the drama: Community, conflict, and culture among inner-city boys. University of Chicago Press. 
  • New York Times – go to nytimes.com and sign up for a free subscription using your NYU email.
  • Additional readings as assigned (see weekly schedule included and NYU Classes) – readings are subject to substitution to reflect newly published data or class interest.

 

 

ASSIGNMENTS & EXPECTATIONS

 

 

Assignment

Date Due

Percent of Final Grade

Class Participation and attendance

 

Ongoing

20%

Assignment 1

Reflective Journal

 

Week 4

15%

Assignment 2

 

Reflective Journal

 

Week 6

15%

Assignment 3

Midterm Paper

Week 10

25%

Assignment 4

Final Paper

Week 14  

25%

 

 

CLASS PARTICIPATION AND ATTENDANCE (20% of Grade)

 

  • Students are expected to come to each class on time and to be prepared to contribute to the group learning process.
  • Religious holidays will be acknowledged. Absences for religious reasons must be cleared in advance with the instructor, but will not be penalized.
  • Students are expected to have completed the required readings.

 

  • Students are asked to read the New York Times and encouraged to consider the following questions.  They will likely be used to facilitate the first 15-minutes of the class discussion each week.
    • What most struck you in the identified article, and why?
    • What are the implications of this article for your personal or professional development?
    • What questions, issues, and concerns do you have about the content (must have at least one)?
    • How would you synthesize the key concepts and emerging themes that appear in the article?  

 

  • Students are expected to participate actively in class discussion and activities, and will be called on if participation is not offered voluntarily.  Class participation influences final grades, so if there is a reason why you cannot participate in class discussion, please alert the instructor immediately.

**Please email the instructor beforehand if you are unable to attend class**

  • Class begins and ends at the specified times, unless changes are made by the instructor.  As a courtesy to others, students are expected to arrive on time and to remain until the end of the class.  Students must inform the instructor if it is necessary to leave class early. 
  • I believe that expecting students to perform well becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy when instructors and institutions hold high expectations and provide students with the support they need.  I am willing to work with you as a team member and to make the extra effort to help you succeed.  I am available during office hours, by appointment, phone and e-mail.

 

Classroom Etiquette

  • Computers, laptops, iPads, tablets, ultrabooks, etc. are permitted in class for the purpose of note taking or other classroom assisted activities.
  • All cell phones must be turned off and away from your desk or lap during class unless the instructor has granted special accommodations. 

 

 

GRADED ASSIGNMENTS

 

PAPER FORMAT

 

  1. All papers must be typewritten, in 12-point Times New Roman font, double-spaced, page-numbered, with 1" margins at the left, right, top and bottom.
  2. The cover page (not included in the page limit) should include the title of the paper, student’s name, assignment number, professor’s name and date submitted.
  3. Papers must be proofread carefully for clarity, organization, spelling, punctuation, and other potential errors before submission. Please you the spelling and grammar check software provided by your writing software.
  4. Students will need to incorporate appropriate references to course readings as well as additional relevant literature throughout the paper. Please make sure these references are academic references.
  5. In-text citations following APA style guidelines are required for all written assignments, with the specific source including authors’ last names and year of publication, regardless of whether you are paraphrasing or using specific quotes. Direct quotes must have the specific source as above but with page number(s).

 

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

 

 

This instructor adheres to University and School policies regarding accommodations for students with disabilities, religious holidays, incomplete grades, plagiarism, and students’ evaluations of this course as set forth in the Student Handbook.

 

Course Evaluation -- Student feedback of this course and its instruction in encouraged throughout the semester, and an anonymous feedback form will be offered to the students mid-semester. Students will be asked to complete a formal evaluation of the course at the semester’s end consistent with the policy of the School of Social Work.

 

**Any student with a documented disability who needs to arrange reasonable accommodations, must contact the instructor and The Henry and Lucy Moses Center for Students with Disabilities, 240 Greene Street, 2nd Floor (212-998-4980) at the beginning of the semester.*

 

Plagiarism

The work you submit in this class must be your own. All ideas of others must be properly cited using APA style guidelines regardless of whether you paraphrase or directly quote the ideas. If you submit work that has been copied without attribution from some published or unpublished source, or that has been prepared by someone other than you, or that in any way misrepresents somebody else's work as your own, you are committing plagiarism. Plagiarism is an ethical violation within the profession of social work and of the University’s Academic Integrity Code. Such acts will face severe discipline by the school/university, including a failing grade for the course and/or dismissal from the program.

 

 

COURSE SCHEDULE

 

Class

Monday

Session Date

Topic of Class Lecture

1

January 27, 2020

Introduction

Human Behavior and the Social Work Profession

Lens of Conceptualizing Problems & Interventions

Person in the Environment

2

February 3, 2020

The Multiple Dimension of Person

The Psychological Person- Cognition, Emotion, and Self

3

February 10, 2020

The Multiple Dimension of Person

The Psychological Person- Relationships, Stress, and Coping

 

February 17, 2020

NO CLASS- Presidents’ Day

4

February 24, 2020

The Multiple Dimension of Person

The Psychological Person- The Biological Being & Spiritual Being

5

March 2, 2020

Culture & Families

6

March 9, 2020

Small Groups and Communities

 

March 16, 2020

NO CLASS- Spring Recess

7

March 23, 2020

Social Structure and Social institutions: National and Global

Invited Guest Speaker

8

March 30, 2020

The Biopsychosocial Dimension

9

April 6, 2020

The Biopsychosocial Dimension   

10

April 13, 2020

The Sociocultural Dimension 

11

April 20, 2020

The Sociocultural Dimension

12

April 27, 2020

The Social Change Dimension

13

May 4, 2020

The Social Change Dimension  

14

May 11, 2020

Make up Session

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COURSE OUTLINE & ASSIGNED READINGS

 

January 27, 2020 Introduction to HBSE II curriculum

 

  • Provide overview of objectives for HBSE II
  • Describe course content, requirements and lecture formats
  • Review the mechanisms by which systems theory creates a meaningful context for understanding development and behavior
  • Review Critical Thinking skills and Biopsychosocial perspective

 

Topical Outline Semester 1

Lenses for Conceptualizing Problems and Interventions

Week 1

Introduction

Human Behavior and the Social Work Profession

Lens of Conceptualizing Problems & Interventions

 

 

 

Week 2

The Multiple Dimension of Person

The Psychological Person- Cognition, Emotion, and Self

 

Readings

 

Hutchison (2015) Chapter 4

The Psychological Person: Cognition, Emotion and Self

 

Week 3

The Multiple Dimension of Person

The Psychological Person- Relationships, Stress, and Coping

 

Readings

 

Hutchison (2015) Chapter 5

The Psychological Person: Relationships, Stress, and Coping

 

Week 4

The Multiple Dimension of Person

The Psychological Person- The Biological Being & Spiritual Being

 

 

Readings

 

Hutchison (2015) Chapter 3 & Chapter 6

The Biological Person

The Spiritual Person

Week 5

Culture & Families

 

 

Readings

 

Hutchison (2015) Chapter 8 & Chapter 10

Culture

Families

Week 6

 

Readings

Small Groups and Communities

 

Hutchison (2015) Chapter 11 & Chapter 13

Small Groups

Communities          

 

 

Week 7       

 

Social Structure and Social institutions: National and Global

Hutchison (2015) Chapter 9

Social Structure and Social Institutions: Global and National

 

Week 8  

Week 9

Readings

 

The Biopsychosocial Dimension

 

Rogers (2016) Chapter 3

Lenses for Conceptualizing Problems and Interventions:

Biopsychosocial Dimensions

 

 

 

Brocious, H. (2017) Erickson’s identity theory and the importance of ethnic exploration for transnational adoptees. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 27:4, 321-333, DOI: 10.1080/10911359.2017.1284029

Graves, S.B. & Larkin, E. (2006) Lessons from Erikson, Journal of Intergenerational Relationships, 4:2, 61-71, DOI: 10.1300/J194v04n02_05 

Week 10  

Week 11

 

The Sociocultural Dimension

 

Readings

Rogers (2016) Chapter 4

Lenses for Conceptualizing Problems and Interventions:

Sociocultural Dimensions

 

Coventry, P. & Okereke, C. (2017). Climate change and environmental justice. In B.S. Caniglia, M. Vallee & B. Frank (Eds.). Resilience, Environmental Justice and the City (pp.362-373). London and New York: Routledge.

Woods, K. (2017). Environmental human rights. In B.S. Caniglia, M. Vallee & B. Frank (Eds.). Resilience, Environmental Justice and the City (pp.149-159). London and New York: Routledge.

Black Feminist Thought – “Mammies, Matriarchs, and Other Controlling Images” – P. Collins

 

Week 12

Week 13

 

Readings

 

The Social Change Dimension

 

Rogers (2016) Chapter 5

Lenses for Conceptualizing Problems and Interventions:

Social Change Dimensions

 

 

Readings for Diversity and Social Justice, Chapter 4: “Theoretical Foundations” – Lee Anne Bell, “Conceptual Foundations” – Rita Hardiman, Bailey W. Jackson, and Pat Griffin

B Dover, M.A. (2016) The moment of microaggression: The experience of acts of oppression, dehumanization, and exploitation. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 26:7-8, 575-586, DOI: 10.1080/10911359.2016.1237920

 

Week 14          Make up Session (Final Paper Due)

 

source..
Content:


Reflection
Name
Institution
Course
Date
REFLECTION
Part 1
Emotions play a very important role in how we work as human beings. Emotions keep us close to people. Sometimes they keep us safe from danger. There are a lot of things that make me happy. Unlike most people, I like watching horror movies. I am not scared and these movies thrill the feelings that bring me a lot of happiness. Driving on the highway is another thing that makes me happy. When I resided in California, there were beautiful mountains and ocean near the highway. Driving on the highway made me feel free. Chatting with my partner makes me feel happy and fulfilled especially when talking about my stressful situations. I like hot and spicy food. The taste of spicy food gives me a sense of fulfilment. Lastly, I love working out. Working out makes me feel confident about my body figure because I am obsessed with fashion and clothes. Sometimes I like experimenting with different styles of clothes.

...
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