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3 pages/≈825 words
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APA
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Health, Medicine, Nursing
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English (U.S.)
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Topic:

Death and Dying (Essay Sample)

Instructions:
Literature Search View Rubric Due Date: Oct 06, 2013 23:59:59 Max Points: 100 Details: Conduct a literature search to locate research articles focused on a practice problem of interest. Identify (3) research articles on the practice problem you have chosen. Create a reference list in which the three articles are listed. Beneath each reference include the article's abstract. The completed assignment should have a title page and a reference list with abstracts. Suggestions for locating qualitative and quantitative research articles from credible sources: 1. Use a library database such as CINAHL Plus with full text for your search. 2. Using the advanced search page check the box beside "Research Article" in the "Limit your results" section. 3. When setting up the search you can type your topic in the top box, then add quantitative or qualitative as a search term in one of the lower boxes. Research articles often are described as qualitative or quantitative. To narrow/broaden your search, remove the words qualitative and quantitative and include words that narrow or broaden your main topic. For example: Diabetes and pediatric and dialysis. To determine what research design was used, review the abstract and the methods section of the article. The author will provide a description of data collection using qualitative or quantitative methods. This assignment uses a grading rubric. Instructors will be using the rubric to grade the assignment; therefore, students should review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the assignment criteria and expectations for successful completion of the assignment. #1 Record: 1 Title: Assessing nurses' attitudes toward death and caring for dying patients in a comprehensive cancer center. Authors: Lange M ; Thom B ; Kline NE Affiliation: Neurology, Orthopedic, and Pain and Palliative Care Unit, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY Source: Oncology Nursing Forum (ONCOL NURS FORUM), 2008 Nov; 35 (6): 955-9. (15 ref) Publication Type: journal article - questionnaire/scale, research, tables/charts Language: English Major Subjects: Attitude to Death -- Evaluation Nurse Attitudes -- Evaluation Oncologic Nursing Terminal Care Minor Subjects: Adult ; Age Factors ; Attitude Measures ; Cancer Care Facilities -- New York ; Conceptual Framework ; Convenience Sample ; Descriptive Research ; Descriptive Statistics ; Female ; Job Experience ; Kruskal-Wallis Test ; Male ; Mann-Whitney U Test ; Middle Age ; New York ; Nursing Models, Theoretical ; Post Hoc Analysis ; Quantitative Studies ; Questionnaires ; Human Abstract: Purpose/Objectives: To assess how nurses employed in a comprehensive cancer center feel about death and caring for dying patients and examine any relationships between their attitudes and demographic factors.Design: Descriptive quantitative.Setting: A 432-bed comprehensive cancer center in New York, NY.Sample: A convenience sample of 355 inpatient and outpatient oncology nurses.Methods: Voluntary and anonymous completion of the Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD), the Death Attitude Profile-Revised (DAP-R), and a demographic questionnaire.Main Research Variables: Years of total nursing experience, years employed at the cancer center, previous experience with caring for dying patients, age, gender, and attitudes toward death and caring for dying patients.Findings: Statistically significant relationships were noted among age, nursing experience, previous experience with caring for terminally ill patients, and scores on the FATCOD and DAP-R. Nursing experience and age were the variables most likely to predict nurses' attitudes toward death and caring for dying patients.Conclusions: RNs with more work experience tended to have more positive attitudes toward death and caring for dying patients.Implications for Nursing: Based on the data collected in the study, less experienced oncology nurses will most likely benefit from increased education, training, and exposure to providing and coping effectively with end-of-life care. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; USA Special Interest: Oncologic Care Instrumentation: Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FAT-COD) Scale, Form B Death Attitude Profile -- Revised (DAP-R) (Wong et al) ISSN: 0190-535X MEDLINE Info: PMID: 18980927 NLM UID: 7809033 Entry Date: 20090102 Revision Date: 20120302 DOI: http://dx(dot)doi(dot)org/10.1188/08.ONF.955-959 Accession Number: 2010092909 Persistent link to this record (Permalink): http://library(dot)gcu(dot)edu:2048/login?url=http://search(dot)ebscohost(dot)com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2010092909&site=eds-live&scope=site Cut and Paste: <a href="http://library(dot)gcu(dot)edu:2048/login?url=http://search(dot)ebscohost(dot)com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2010092909&site=eds-live&scope=site">Assessing nurses' attitudes toward death and caring for dying patients in a comprehensive cancer center.</a> Database: CINAHL Plus with Full Text The link information above provides a persistent link to the article you've requested. Persistent link to this record: Following the link above will bring you to the start of the article or citation. Cut and Paste: To place article links in an external web document, simply copy and paste the HTML above, starting with "<a href" If you have any problems or questions, contact Technical Support at http://support(dot)epnet(dot)com/contact/askus.php or call 800-758-5995. This e-mail was generated by a user of EBSCOhost who gained access via the GRAND CANYON UNIV account. Neither EBSCO nor GRAND CANYON UNIV is responsible for the content of this e-mail. #2 Record: 1 Title: GREEK RENAL NURSES' ATTITUDES TOWARDS DEATH. Authors: Zyga, Sofia ; Malliarou, Maria ; Lavdaniti, Maria ; Athanasopoulou, Maria ; Sarafis, Paul Affiliation: Department of Nursing, University of Peloponnese, Sparta, Greece University of Athens, Nursing Faculty, Scientific Collaborator of Technological Institution of Larisa, Nursing Department, Larisa, Greece Institute of Thessalonica, Thessalonica, Greece University of Athens, Nursing Faculty, Athens, Greece Source: Journal of Renal Care (J RENAL CARE), 2011 Jun; 37 (2): 101-7. (15 ref) Publication Type: journal article - pictorial, research, tables/charts Language: English Major Subjects: Nurse Attitudes Attitude to Death Hemodialysis -- Psychosocial Factors Hemodialysis -- Nursing Minor Subjects: Human ; Greece ; Descriptive Research ; Quantitative Studies ; Questionnaires ; Adult ; Female ; Male ; Coefficient Alpha ; Test-Retest Reliability ; Terminally Ill Patients Abstract: This study aims to assess how Greek renal nurses feel about death and examine any relationships between their attitudes and demographic factors. Design: Descriptive quantitative study. The sample comprised of 49 nurses. Methodology: Voluntary and anonymous completion of the Death Attitude Profile-Revised and a demographic questionnaire. Results: 44 respondents were female and 5 were male with a mean age of 25.80 years. The mean nursing experience was 10.9 years. Nursing experience and age were the variables most likely to predict nurses' attitudes towards death. Nurses with specific education on palliative care had less difficulty talking about death and dying and did not have a fear of death. The Hospital-based teams (known as palliative care teams, supportive care teams or symptom assessment teams) had statistically significant different relationships with fear of death and neutral acceptance scores. Conclusions: It is recommended to include education on death and care of the dying in the nursing degree course in order for nurses who are giving terminal phase patient care to be better able deal with issues that death evolves. Journal Subset: Blind Peer Reviewed; Continental Europe; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed Instrumentation: Death Attitude Profile-Revised (DAP-R) ISSN: 1755-6678 MEDLINE Info: PMID: 21561546 NLM UID: 101392167 Entry Date: 20110805 Revision Date: 20130510 DOI: http://dx(dot)doi(dot)org/10.1111/j.1755-6686.2011.00210.x Accession Number: 2011042288 Persistent link to this record (Permalink): http://library(dot)gcu(dot)edu:2048/login?url=http://search(dot)ebscohost(dot)com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2011042288&site=eds-live&scope=site Cut and Paste: <a href="http://library(dot)gcu(dot)edu:2048/login?url=http://search(dot)ebscohost(dot)com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2011042288&site=eds-live&scope=site">GREEK RENAL NURSES' ATTITUDES TOWARDS DEATH.</a> Database: CINAHL Plus with Full Text The link information above provides a persistent link to the article you've requested. Persistent link to this record: Following the link above will bring you to the start of the article or citation. Cut and Paste: To place article links in an external web document, simply copy and paste the HTML above, starting with "<a href" If you have any problems or questions, contact Technical Support at http://support(dot)epnet(dot)com/contact/askus.php or call 800-758-5995. This e-mail was generated by a user of EBSCOhost who gained access via the GRAND CANYON UNIV account. Neither EBSCO nor GRAND CANYON UNIV is responsible for the content of this e-mail. #3 Record: 1 Title: Multicultural aging. Caring for dying patients and those facing death in an acute-care hospital in Singapore: a nurse's perspective. Authors: Tan J ; Low JA ; Yap P ; Lee A ; Pang WS ; Wu Y Affiliation: Department of Geriatric Medicine, Alexandra Hospital, Singapore Source: Journal of Gerontological Nursing (J GERONTOL NURS), 2006 May; 32 (5): 17-24. (35 ref) Publication Type: journal article - pictorial, research, tables/charts Language: English Major Subjects: Attitude to Death Nurse Attitudes Terminally Ill Patients -- Singapore Minor Subjects: Adult ; Chi Square Test ; Confidence Intervals ; Descriptive Research ; Ethnic Groups ; Exploratory Research ; Fisher's Exact Test ; Funding Source ; Middle Age ; Nurse-Patient Relations ; Questionnaires ; Singapore ; Summated Rating Scaling ; Human Abstract: Nurses are at the forefront of caring for dying patients in hospices, nursing homes, acute-care hospitals, and patients' homes. This study was conducted to explore the emotional and practical experience as well as attitudes of nurses caring for the dying and the deceased in an acute-care hospital in Singapore. The authors explored differences in opinion among the various ethnic groups (Malay, Chinese, Indian, Filipino) that make up the nurse population in this particular hospital. A structured questionnaire was self-administered by the participants to explore nurses' views, opinions, and experiences in caring for dying patients from a quantitative aspect. It specifically addressed attitudinal, ethical, and communicational issues involved in caring for dying patients. Where applicable, a Likert scale ranging from Always to Never or from Strongly Agree to Strongly Disagree was used. One hundred and eighty of 246 questionnaires were returned (73%). Most respondents never or only occasionally felt uncomfortable caring for dying patients, and felt it reminded them of their own mortality, made them treasure life more, and made them ask questions about life and death. In this descriptive study, some difference in attitudes and views among the various ethnic groups was observed. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA Special Interest: Gerontologic Care ISSN: 0098-9134 MEDLINE Info: PMID: 16708980 NLM UID: 7510258 Grant Information: Department of Geriatric Medicine, Alexandra Hospital, Singapore Entry Date: 20060728 Revision Date: 20091218 Accession Number: 2009197095 Persistent link to this record (Permalink): http://library(dot)gcu(dot)edu:2048/login?url=http://search(dot)ebscohost(dot)com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2009197095&site=eds-live&scope=site Cut and Paste: <a href="http://library(dot)gcu(dot)edu:2048/login?url=http://search(dot)ebscohost(dot)com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2009197095&site=eds-live&scope=site">Multicultural aging. Caring for dying patients and those facing death in an acute-care hospital in Singapore: a nurse's perspective.</a> Database: CINAHL Plus with Full Text source..
Content:
Death and dying Name University Date Death and dying Lange M, Thom B, & Kline NE. (2008). Assessing Nurses` Attitudes Toward Death and Caring for Dying Patients in a Comprehensive Cancer Center; Oncology Nursing Forum, 35 (6), 955-959 Introduction The purpose of the research was to find out the feeling of nurses, who work in comprehensive cancer, about dying of patients and about death as well as establish any correlation between demographic factors and attitude. It was a descriptive quantitative research with 335 outpatient and inpatient nurses as the sample size. The research was conducted in comprehensive center for cancer in New York which had a 432-bed capacity. Data collection methods adopted in this research were demographic questionnaire, DAP-R (Death Attitude Profile-Revised) as well as the voluntary but anonymous completion of (FATCOD), Frommelt Attitude Towards Care of the Dying. The variables in the research were also established as; attitude concerning death, age, caring for patients who are dying, gender, nursing years experience, prior experience for caring for patients who are dying and years working at cancer center. The research showed a correlation between this variable and the attitude of nurses towards caring for patients who are dying and death. The age of the oncology nurses and nursing experience were the most likely variables which tends to predict the attitude of these nurse towards caring for patients who are dying and death. Scores on DAP-R and FATCOD as well as the variables predicted the attitude of nurses. In conclusion, the authors found out that more years of work implied an attitude that is more positive towards caring for patients who are dying and death and that less experienced nurses stood to benefit from enhanced training, education and exposure to life care. Zyga S., Mallairou M., Lavdaniti M., Athanasopoulou M., Sarafis P. (2011). Greek renal nurses` attitudes towards death; Journal of Renal Care 37 (2), 100-107 Introduction The article seeks to address the feelings of Greek renal nurses concerning death and to assess and examine existing relationships between their demographic factors and attitudes. The study design was that of a descriptive quantity study with a sa...
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