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4 pages/≈1100 words
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APA
Subject:
Education
Type:
Essay
Language:
English (U.S.)
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Preparing for Assessment Lesson Plan. Education Essay (Essay Sample)

Instructions:

Cite and reference 2-3 Scholarly articles.
Select a secondary grade level and content area. Identify a corresponding state standard from your state and create a lesson plan using the "COE Lesson Plan Template." Be sure to include:
Lesson summary including state standard.
Outline of the classroom and student factors, including grade level and content.
Two learning objectives.
Instructional activities that correlate to the objectives.
A description of the type of assessment you will use and why.
A pre-assessment method.
Prior knowledge necessary.
Additionally, write a 500-750 word reflection on the lesson plan that you created, justifying your decisions regarding the planning, instructional opportunities, and assessment types used. Reflect mainly on the process of preparing/choosing assessments and providing accommodations. Explain how the plan is designed to meet the needs of students at varying levels of intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development.
Cite and reference 2-3 scholarly articles.
Submit the lesson plan and the reflection as one deliverable.
Prepare this assignment according to the guidelines found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. An abstract is not required.
This assignment uses a rubric. Review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.
You are required to submit this assignment to LopesWrite.
DescriptionPercentage
No Submission
0.00 %
Insufficient
69.00 %
Approaching
74.00 %
Acceptable
87.00 %
Target
100.00 %
Criteria
100.0
Lesson Plan: Summary and State Standard
15.0
No submission
Lesson plan does not identify how the lesson will promote problem-solving and communication skills for the grade level.
Lesson plan inadequately identifies how the lesson will promote problem-solving and communication skills for the grade level.
Lesson plan clearly identifies how the lesson will promote problem-solving and communication skills for the grade level.
Lesson plan skillfully and concisely identifies how the lesson will promote problem-solving and communication skills for the grade level.
Lesson Plan: Outline of Classroom and Student Factors, Grade Level, and Content
15.0
No submission
Lesson plan does not outline the classroom and student factors, including grade level and content.
Lesson plan inadequately outlines the classroom and student factors, including grade level and content.
Lesson plan clearly outlines the classroom and student factors, including grade level and content.
Lesson plan skillfully and concisely outlines the classroom and student factors, including grade level and content.
Lesson Plan: Two Learning Objectives
10.0
No submission
Lesson plan does not identify two objectives.
Lesson plan inadequately identifies two learning objectives.
Lesson plan clearly identifies two learning objectives.
Lesson plan skillfully and concisely identifies two learning objectives.
Lesson Plan: Instructional Activities
15.0
No submission
Lesson plan does not correlate instructional activities to the objectives.
Lesson plan inadequately correlates instructional activities to the objectives.
Lesson plan clearly correlates instructional activities to the objectives.
Lesson plan skillfully and concisely correlates instructional activities to the objectives.
Lesson Plan: Type of Assessment, Pre-assessment and Prior Knowledge
15.0
No submission
Lesson plan does not describe the type of assessment, a pre-assessment method, and necessary prior knowledge.
Lesson plan inadequately describes the type of assessment, a pre-assessment method, and necessary prior knowledge.
Lesson plan clearly describes the type of assessment, a pre-assessment method, and necessary prior knowledge.
Lesson plan skillfully and concisely describes the type of assessment, a pre-assessment method, and necessary prior knowledge
Reflection
15.0
No submission
Reflection does not justify reason for planning, instructional opportunities, and assessment types used in the lesson plan. Does not addresses how the lesson meets the needs of students and their varying levels of intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development.
Reflection inadequately justifies reason for planning, instructional opportunities, and assessment types used in the lesson plan. Somewhat addresses how the lesson meets the needs of students and their varying levels of intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development.
Reflection clearly justifies reason for planning, instructional opportunities, and assessment types used in the lesson plan. Clearly describes how the lesson meets the needs of students and their varying levels of intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development.
Reflection skillfully and concisely justifies reason for planning, instructional opportunities, and assessment types used in the lesson plan. Thoroughly describes how the lesson meets the needs of students and their varying levels of intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development.
Organization
10.0
No submission
An attempt is made to organize the content, but the sequence is indiscernible. The ideas presented are compartmentalized and may not relate to each other.
The content may not be adequately organized even though it provides the audience with a sense of the main idea.
The content is logically organized. The ideas presented relate to each other. The content provides the audience with a clear sense of the main idea.
The content is well-organized and logical. There is a sequential progression of ideas that relate to each other. The content is presented as a cohesive unit and provides the audience with a clear sense of the main idea.
Mechanics (spelling, punctuation, grammar, and language use)
5.0
No submission
Surface errors are pervasive enough that they impede communication of meaning. Inappropriate word choice or sentence construction are used.
Frequent and repetitive mechanical errors distract the reader. Inconsistencies in language or word choice may be present. Sentence structure may not be varied.
The submission includes some mechanical errors, but they do not hinder comprehension. A variety of effective sentence structures are used, as well as some practice and content-related language.
The submission is virtually free of mechanical errors. Word choice reflects well-developed use of practice and content-related language. Sentence structures are varied and engaging.
Total Percentage 100
example of lesson plans
Teacher Candidate:
Grade Level:
Date:
Unit/Subject:
Instructional Plan Title
11th grade
March 22, 2017
English
Reading, Writing and Presenting Short Stories
I. PLANNING
Lesson summary and focus:
This is a lesson designed to introduce students to writing short stories. They will create short stories by exploring three elements of a short story: theme, setting and conflict. A variety of activities will be introduced to compliment the needs and strengths of each student.
Classroom and student factors:
The students all enjoyed the short stories that we read, but a few challenges were presented.
1. There are students who do not grasp some of the latest vocabulary that was introduced.
2. There are students who are performing on par with expectations.
3. There are students who seemed to have mastered the ideas presented.
National / State Learning Standards:
1. Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text. (11‐12.RI.2
2. Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text. (11‐12.RI.3)
3. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10). (11‐12.RI.4)
4. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well‐chosen details, and well‐structured event sequences.
a. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.
b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
c. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).
d. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative. (11‐12.W.3)
5. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information. (11‐12.W.6)
6. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one‐on‐ one, in groups, and teacher‐led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
a. Come to discussions prepared having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well‐ reasoned exchange of ideas.
b. Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision‐making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.
c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.
d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task. (11‐12.SL.1)
.
Specific learning target(s) / objectives:
Students will read, write and speak knowledgably about short stories.
Students will speak, read and write literary prose and interpret analysis.
Students will be able to write their own short stories.
Teaching notes:
Week 3 Lesson Objectives.
Agenda:
Students will first complete a short writing assignment so that I can assess what their thoughts are of what times may have been like during the time that the story took place. I will ask questions such as how do you think you would feel if? Ect…
Formative assessment:
Pre-assessment
Mid-Week Quiz
Academic Language:
Key vocabulary:
Character Development
Theme
Setting Conflict
Function:
Clarify the purpose the language is intended to achieve within each subject area. Functions often consist of the verbs found in the standards and learning goal statements. How will your students demonstrate their understanding?
Form:
Describe the structures or ways of organizing language to serve a particular function within each subject area. What kinds of structures will you implement so that your students might demonstrate their depth of understanding?
Instructional Materials, Equipment and Technology:
Books for short stories
Classroom computers to compose short stories.
Grouping:
Students will initially be individual (group read).
Students displaying the need for additional help with be grouped together to receive additional review while other students move on to begin working on their own short stories based on the reading.
Students will all then come together again at the end of class.
II. INSTRUCTION
A. Opening
Prior knowledge connection:
I will tie together key elements from authors that we have studied in the prior two lessons. They previously learned the elements of a story and will now learn the important elements to express new ideas and creativity through projects.
Anticipatory set:
Each student has his/her own unique talents. By being able to choose between various activities for the project, each will be able to express what was learned in a way that is personally meaningful.
B. Learning and Teaching Activities (Teaching and Guided Practice):
I Do
Students Do
Differentiation
I will begin to read a short story aloud and designate other students to do the same. I will stop intermittently to ask what they think the author means, and why he wrote his sentence structure that way.
I will give students will be given a pre-assessment upon entering the classroom along with markers. After which they will be place in one of three groups based on where they are.
I will instruct students to construct their own short stories to be shared aloud in class and finished at home.
Based on group assignments the projects will be assigned in which one group will re-enact a scene from the story by writing a song, the second group will design a travel pamphlet to a destination based on the story and the third group will create a diary with journal entries for one week from a character in the story.
.
Students will listen, read aloud and communicate verbally to gain an understanding of well-written short stories.
Students will take the assessment and move into groups based on understanding of prior knowledge for later assignment.
Students will begin work individually to construct their own short stories.
Based on group assignments the projects will be assigned in which one group will re-enact a scene from the story by writing a song, the second group will design a travel pamphlet to a destination based on the story and the third group will create a diary with journal entries for one week from a character in the story.
Describe methods of differentiation, including accommodation or differentiation strategies for academically, behaviorally and motivationally challenged students.
Please use a corresponding numbered list.
Also include extension activities: What will students who finish early do?
III. ASSESSMENT
Summative Assessment:
I will assess the readiness of students to move forward based on classroom participation and the quality of the projects that end this lesson.
Differentiation:
The group that is behind will work more with me to cover any areas that are lacking. Recapping sentence structure and syntax should those still be specific areas of concern.
Closure:
Students will express what they have learned through classroom conversations, presentation and writing assignments. Having assignments assigned based on strengths and interests will allow them to confidently speak and present in the future.
Homework:
Students will finish their short stories at home to present in class later in the week. They will have time in class to come together for their group projects, but will be expected to complete some of the requirements on their own time.

source..
Content:


Preparing for Assessment Lesson Plan
Name
Institution
Teacher Candidate:
Grade Level: 6th
Subject: Literature
Instructional Plan Title: Analysis and Response to literary texts.
* PLANNING
Lesson plan summary and focus
This lesson plan is created to expose students to strategies of analyzing literary texts and responding to them according to their identification and interpretation of literary devices that characterize the text. The lesson shall adapt diverse activities to influence the students’ comprehension of the prevalent themes, irony, and metaphor among other devices.
Classroom and Student Factors:
There are students who will take longer to comprehend the text compared to their counterpart.
There are students who will lose interest due to their passion in other subjects.

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