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Reflection Paper: experience with a social welfare agency Social Paper (Term Paper Sample)

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This is an assignment for a social work class. Make sure you know what social work is.( social work is not sociology)
In this essay it is asking you to describe a personal( or your friend’s) experience with a social welfare agency and then analyze it.
I’m not giving any information to you so you can write your own experience, something you heard about, or make up stories if you want.( you can also call any social welfare agency to get some information)
However, make sure that when you write this essay, you should note whatever stories you bring up as “ my friend’s experience” since if you write “my experience”, my instructor may question something about it.(Also, I’m an international student from China so most of my friends are Chinese, my friends from other races are all my classmate in school.)
I’ve attached the detailed requirement of the assignment and course syllabus. Please read carefully before you start.

ASSIGNMENT #1: Reflection Paper (10%) due week 3 This assignment aims to meet Course Objectives 1 and 3.Instructions: Write a 3-4-page paper on a time when you encountered/interfaced with a social service agency whether for yourself, a family member, a friend or other person that you know.
What type of agency was it?
What was that experience like, and did the experience meet expectations?
Was there a feeling of respect, compassion, and support? In what way(s) did this come across? If not, in what way(s) did that come across?
Did you think the services offered were useful and relevant to the issue they were attempting to address?
Would you recommend this agency to someone you cared about?
If you were auditing this agency, what changes would you propose be made to make it better for people seeking services from them?

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION As major providers of social welfare benefits, social workers must have an understanding of the organization and structure of the social welfare system and the many kinds of programs and agencies that provide social services within systems. The course will provide a framework of how social welfare agencies are designed, funded, staffed, and operated to carry out their mission. We will explore a variety of organizational settings to help students understand not only the role and function of agencies in communities, but also as places of employment. Specific attention will be paid to the interplay of organizational structures, dynamics and settings in which social services are provided, and how these factors affect social work practice. Social workers are tasked with navigating within systems and agencies that may be mission driven, but beholden to funding. In the course of their daily work, social workers will balance the demands of their role, resources available and work environment with an understanding of how they fit into the larger context of their organization. We will discuss practical skills, strategies for social workers to feel empowered as practitioners, colleagues and agents of positive social change. As we examine and understand the role and function of agencies in communities we will also discuss the systemic roots of inequality that promote social and economic injustice. We will also consider the implications of institutionalized discrimination and oppression for individuals, families and communities and how these injustices are often upheld in agencies. This course is designed to prepare students to act as knowledgeable, competent practitioners working for and within agencies and communities as informed, able participants in achieving social change. Content includes the history of social welfare and social work, the values and philosophical base of social work, and the purpose and organizational/operational functions of social welfare agencies. 2 COURSE OBJECTIVES of UNDSW-US 11- 002 – AGENCIES AND ORGANIZATIONS Objective # Objectives 1 Students will develop an understanding of how social welfare agencies are designed and function in terms of mission, organizational structure and funding. 2 Students will be able to identify the various organizational auspices of social service agencies (governmental, non-profit, for-profit) and understanding of how funding and regulatory bodies impact the availability, provision and delivery of health and human services. a. Students will develop the ability to critically evaluate the pros and cons of each auspice. 3 Students will develop an understanding of the various roles, functions, relationships, and responsibilities of key stakeholders within agencies. 4 Students will develop an understanding that agencies are unique workplaces each with their own dynamics, policies, procedures and organizational culture. 5 Students will develop an understanding of the social control function of social welfare and dilemmas confronted in practice in carrying out social work’s dual role of agents of social control and advocates for social justice. a. Students will be aware of the systemic roots of inequality that promote social and economic injustice and how these injustices are often upheld in agencies. 6 Students will develop an understanding of the expectations as an agency employee, the important use of supervision as a means of support, and the effects of vicarious trauma in their professional role 7 Students will challenge themselves to consider the perspectives, priorities and values of others and their individual rights to self-determination. COURSE FORMAT This course will include small and large group discussions, lectures, short films, guest speakers and small group work. Students will be asked to actively participate during class which will support our collective learning and share multiple perspectives. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES Below are the nine Social Work Competencies as defined by CSWE. The competencies marked with an * indicate the specific competencies that are highlighted in this course. * Competency 1: Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior * Competency 2: Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice Competency 3: Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice Competency 4: Engage in Practice-informed Research and Research-informed Practice * Competency 5: Engage in Policy Practice Competency 6: Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities Competency 7: Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities Competency 8: Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities 3 Competency 9: Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities Dimensions of Competencies: K = Knowledge, V = Values, S = Skills, CA = Cognitive Affective Processes The following tables show the specific CSWE Competencies that will be highlighted during this course, the dimensions of each competency and the course objectives. The final column provides the location of the course content by weeks, assignments, and activities 4 Competency Objectives Dimensions Content Competency 1: Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior Social workers understand the value base of the profession and its ethical standards, as well as relevant laws and regulations that may impact practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Social workers understand frameworks of ethical decisionmaking and how to apply principles of critical thinking to those frameworks in practice, research, and policy arenas. Social workers recognize personal values and the distinction between personal and professional values. They also understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions influence their professional judgment and behavior. Social workers understand the profession’s history, its mission, and the roles and responsibilities of the profession. Social Workers also understand the role of other professions when engaged in interprofessional teams. Social workers recognize the importance of life-long learning and are committed to continually updating their skills to ensure they are relevant and effective. Social workers also understand emerging forms of technology and the ethical use of technology in social work practice. Social workers: • make ethical decisions by applying the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws and regulations, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context; • use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations; • demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior; appearance; and oral, written, and electronic communication; • use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes; and • use supervision and consultation to guide professional judgment and behavior. Objective 3: Students will develop an understanding of the various roles, functions, relationships, and responsibilities of key stakeholders within agencies. K, V Weeks: 5-9, and 11 Assignments: 1-3 Participation Objective 4: Students will develop an understanding that agencies are unique workplaces each with their own dynamics, policies, procedures and organizational culture. K, V Weeks: 4-6, 8-11 Assignments: 2, 3 Participation Objective 5: Students will develop an understanding of the social control function of social welfare and dilemmas confronted in practice in carrying out social work’s dual role of agents of social control and advocates for social justice. K, V, S, C/A Weeks: 1, 2, 4-6, 8, 10 Assignments: 2, 3 Participation Objective 5a: Students will be aware of the systemic roots of inequality that promote social and economic injustice and how these injustices are often upheld in agencies. K, V, C/A Weeks: 1, 2, 4-6, 8, 10 Assignments: 2, 3 Participation Objective 6: Students will develop an understanding of the expectations as an agency employee, the important use of supervision as a means of support, and the effects of vicarious trauma in their professional role. K, V, S, C/A Weeks: 6, 7, 11 Assignments: 2, 3 Participation Objective 7: Students will challenge themselves to consider the perspectives, priorities and values of others and their individual rights to self-determination. K, V, C/A Weeks: 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, Assignments: 2, 3 Participation 5 Competency Objectives Dimensions Content Competency 2: Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice Social workers understand how diversity and difference characterize and shape the human experience and are critical to the formation of identity. The dimensions of diversity are understood as the intersectionality of multiple factors including but not limited to age, class, color, culture, disability and ability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, marital status, political ideology, race, religion/spirituality, sex, sexual orientation, and tribal sovereign status. Social workers understand that, as a consequence of difference, a person’s life experiences may include oppression, poverty, marginalization, and alienation as well as privilege, power, and acclaim. Social workers also understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination and recognize the extent to which a culture’s structures and values, including social, economic, political, and cultural exclusions, may oppress, marginalize, alienate, or create privilege and power. Social workers: ● apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference in shaping life experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels; ● present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of their own experiences; and ● apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies. Objective 4: Students will develop an understanding that agencies are unique workplaces each with their own dynamics, policies, procedures and organizational culture. K, V Weeks: 4-6, 8-11 Assignments: 2-3 Participation Objective 5: Students will develop an understanding of the social control function of social welfare and dilemmas confronted in practice in carrying out social work’s dual role of agents of social control and advocates for social justice. K, V, S, C/A Weeks: 1, 2, 4-6, 8, 10 Assignments: 2-3 Participation Objective 5a: Students will be aware of the systemic roots of inequality that promote social and economic injustice and how these injustices are often upheld in agencies. K, V, C/A Weeks: 1, 2, 4-6, 8, 10 Assignments: 2-3 Participation Objective 7: Students will challenge themselves to consider the perspectives, priorities and values of others and their individual rights to self-determination. K, V, C/A Weeks: 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, Assignments: 2, 3 Participation 6 Competency Objectives Dimensions Content Competency 5: Engage in Policy Practice Social workers understand that human rights and social justice, as well as social welfare and services, are mediated by policy and its implementation at the federal, state, and local levels. Social workers understand the history and current structures of social policies and services, the role of policy in service delivery, and the role of practice in policy development. Social workers understand their role in policy development and implementation within their practice settings at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels and they actively engage in policy practice to effect change within those settings. Social workers recognize and understand the historical, social, cultural, economic, organizational, environmental, and global influences that affect social policy. They are also knowledgeable about policy formulation, analysis, implementation, and evaluation. Social workers: ● Identify social policy at the local, state, and federal level that impacts well-being, service delivery, and access to social services; ● assess how social welfare and economic policies impact the delivery of and access to social services; ● apply critical thinking to analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice. Objective 1: Students will develop an understanding of how social welfare agencies are designed and function in terms of mission, organizational structure and funding. K Weeks: 1 -5 Assignments: 1 – 3 Participation Objective 2: Students will be able to identify the various organizational auspices of social service agencies (governmental, non-profit, for-profit) and understanding of how funding and regulatory bodies impact the availability, provision and delivery of health and human services. K, V Weeks: 2-4, 10 Assignments: 2, 3 Participation Objective 2a: Students will develop the ability to critically evaluate the pros and cons of each auspice. K, S Weeks: 3, 4 Assignments; 2, 3 Participation Objective 7: Students will challenge themselves to consider the perspectives, priorities and values of others and their individual rights to self-determination. K, V, C/A Weeks: 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, Assignments: 2, 3 Participation 7 COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND EXPECTATIONS Assignments (75%) There are three written assignments for this course. Assignment #1 is a reflection paper worth 10% of your grade. Assignment #2 is a Midterm paper worth 30% of your grade, and Assignment #3 a Final Exam Group project to be presented in class at the end of the semester worth 35% of your grade. Weekly readings and classroom engagement/participation (25%) This class asks that you come prepared to class having read the assigned reading each week. There is a required textbook as well as journal articles which are all noted on the reading list. We will be engaging in discussions about the readings and weekly topic which will count for 25% of your grade. Each student’s input and insights will help contribute to the collective classroom experience. Participation is defined by contributing to discussions, raising thoughtful questions and working collaboratively. Without having read the material, you will have a limited opportunity to participate, and your grade will be impacted. Students are welcome to suggest articles and videos (please email me your suggestions) to be shared with the class that would support our learning. Each month you will complete a self-rated classroom engagement form (a sample is at the end of the syllabus). The purpose of this exercise is for students to take an active role in their learning as well as making important contributions to our classroom experience as a whole. The rubric will allow you to rate yourself, and combined with the teacher rating, will determine your participation grade. Attendance: Please plan to arrive on time and stay for the duration of the class. Students are required to attend all classes and to notify the instructor when they are absent prior to the beginning of class. It is the student's responsibility to make up for missed material, even in the case of illness, religious holidays, or other situations. To make up for missed classes, students may be required to do additional work at the discretion of the instructor. Note that frequent absences and/or lateness will impact your grade. If you are not in class, you are unable to participate. FACULTY ADHERENCES AND SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS All instructors adhere to University and School policies regarding accommodations for students with disabilities, religious holidays, incomplete grades, and plagiarism. Students requesting accommodations due to disability issues must register with the Moses Center for Students with Disabilities (address: 726 Broadway, 2nd floor; phone: 212-998- 4980; web: www.nyu.edu/csd). An accommodation letter listing approved accommodations will be generated by the Moses Center and given to the student, who must deliver the letter to the professor before accommodations can be used in any course. We request that students provide the accommodation letters to the appropriate professor as early as possible in the semester so that accommodations may be arranged. 8 GRADING POLICY Final grades will be determined from the total number of points accumulated, as follows: Point Total Letter Grade Point Total Letter Grade 100 - 94 A 86 - 84 B 93 - 90 A- 83 - 80 B- 89 - 87 B+ 79 - 77 C+ 76 - 74 C 73 - 70 C- 69 - 65 D 64 or below F CLASSROOM COMMUNITY We will be spending 14 weeks together as a group and learning community. The classroom is a place where we can learn from each other, reflect on our own beliefs and ideas and challenge ourselves. In a group setting we have the opportunity to gather collective wisdom in the sharing of diverse viewpoints. When we engage in dialogue, we should aim to listen to understand without a need to respond as to honor each person’s lived experience. There may be moments during the semester that challenge us to stretch our thinking beyond what feels comfortable. When these moments occur, I encourage you to check in with yourself and pay attention to what you are thinking and feeling. Hard moments can be an opportunity for growth and learning. Please do your best to keep an open mind, a willingness to seek understanding outside of yourself and maintain a sense of curiosity and humor. At the beginning of the course we will generate a list of community guidelines that we agree on, in addition to the classroom etiquette noted here. ● Please turn off phones and keep them away during class. ● Laptops can be used for notetaking, but not for surfing the web or social media use. ● Audio and/or video recording in the classroom is not permitted without prior communication with the instructor. ● If you bring food or drinks into class, please eat quietly and be sure to clean up after yourself when class ends. ● Honor the dignity, cultural diversity, and right of self-determination of all class members by giving respectful, mindful feedback. ● Limit your sharing to questions, opinions, information, or personal experiences that relate to the topic at hand and/or your professional growth and development. ● Direct all comments, questions, and sharing to the class as a whole instead of the individuals next to you. ● Respect the privacy of classmates who share personal information or experiences. OFFICE HOURS AND COMMUNICATION Office hours are by appointment and are best arranged by email. All students are encouraged to contact me with any questions or concerns that you may have about the course. I will check my emails during business hours, and will reply as soon as I can, so if you are contacting me about an urgent matter, please keep this in mind. If you would like to schedule a time to come in, please include a few days and times that you are available in your request. Students are encouraged to provide feedback and arrange to meet with me if there are ways in which I can support you in your learning. If you find that you are experiencing challenges that are hindering your ability to meet the requirements of the course – please reach out and we can meet to discuss. 9 COURSE EVALUATION Student feedback is encouraged throughout the semester. Consistent with the policy of the NYU Silver School of Social Work, students will be asked to complete a formal online evaluation of the course at the end of the semester. Course Overview Week Date Topic Assignment Due 1 1/28/20 Welcome and Course Overview Course introduction and syllabus review Classroom community guidelines History of Social Welfare Agencies 2 2/5/20 Overview of Agencies Social work practice in agencies Ethical points of conflict 3 2/12/20 Distinguishing Features of Agencies Public vs. Private Organizations Mission Statements Reflection paper due before the beginning of class. 4 2/19/20 How Organizations are Financed Grants, contracts and foundations The Non-Profit Industrial Complex White Supremacy culture 5 2/26/20 Who Has the Power? – Roles in Organizations Boards, CEO’s Authority, leadership and power Racial and cultural dynamics in groups 6 3/4/20 The Work Environment Organizational culture and climate Leadership styles Job satisfaction and burnout 7 3/11/20 Supervision The function of supervision Professional development Performance evaluations Vicarious trauma Midterm papers due before the beginning of class. 8 3/25/20 Social Work Practice in Host Settings ➢ Challenges and role incongruity 9 4/1/20 Conditions of Work ➢ Organizational policies ➢ Laws that govern work 10 4/8/20 The Changing Environment of Organizations and Internal Sources of Organizational Change Changing public policies Data driven solutions Turnover and Restructure New Initiatives Evidence Based Practice 11 4/15/20 Coping with Change – Making Your Organization Better Strength based approaches 10 Collaboration at work Building skills 12 4/22/20 In Class Group Work 13 4/29/20 Final Presentations All presentations and group rating forms are due before the beginning of class on week 13 14 5/6/20 Final Presentations All presentations and group rating forms are due before the beginning of class on week 13 Required Textbook: Furman, R., & Gibelman, M. (Eds.). (2013) Essential Information for Thriving and Surviving in Agencies: Navigating Human Service Organizations (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: Lyceum Books, INC. ***All additional required reading for this class can be located using NYU libraries. Many of the articles will also be posted on NYU Classes. Optional Reading List I will share an additional optional reading list on our class site. While not required, the readings will add another layer to our classroom discussions. 11 Course Schedule, Objectives and Reading List by Week Week 1: Welcome and Course Overview ➢ Course introduction and syllabus review ➢ Classroom community guidelines ➢ History of Social Welfare Agencies This unit relates to course objectives: 1, 5, 5a and 7 Required Readings: N/A Week 2: Overview of Agencies ➢ Social work practice in agencies ➢ Ethical points of conflict This unit relates to course objectives: 1, 2, 5, 5a, and 7 Required Readings: Furman, R., & Gibelman, M. (Eds.). (2013) Essential Information for Thriving and Surviving in Agencies: Navigating Human Service Organizations (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: Lyceum Books, INC. Chapter 1 Ramsundarsingh, S., & Shier, M. L. (2017). Anti-oppressive organizational dynamics in the social services: A literature review. British Journal of Social Work, 47(8), 2308-2327. Week 3: Distinguishing Features of Agencies ➢ Public vs. Private Organizations ➢ Mission Statements This unit relates to course objectives: 1 and 2, and 2a Required Readings: Furman, R., & Gibelman, M. (Eds.). (2013) Essential Information for Thriving and Surviving in Agencies: Navigating Human Service Organizations (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: Lyceum Books, INC. Chapter 2. Lu, J., & Park, J. (2018). Bureaucratization, Professionalization, and Advocacy Engagement in Nonprofit Human Service Organizations. Human Service Organizations: Management, Leadership & Governance, 42(4), 380-395 M. Nkomo, S., & Al Ariss, A. (2014). The historical origins of ethnic (white) privilege in US organizations. Journal of Managerial Psychology, 29(4), 389-404 Week 4: How Organizations are Financed ➢ Grants, contracts and foundations ➢ The Non-Profit Industrial Complex ➢ White Supremacy culture This unit relates to course objectives: 1, 2, 2a, 4, 5, 5a and 7 12 Required Readings: Furman, R., & Gibelman, M. (Eds.). (2013) Essential Information for Thriving and Surviving in Agencies: Navigating Human Service Organizations (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: Lyceum Books, INC. Chapter 3 Smith, A. (2009). The Revolution Will Not Be Funded: Beyond the non-profit industrial complex. (pp. 1-18). Week 5: Who Has the Power? – Roles in Organizations ➢ Boards, CEO’s ➢ Authority, leadership and power ➢ Racial and cultural dynamics in groups This unit relates to course objectives: 1, 3, 4, 5, 5a, and 7 Required Readings: Furman, R., & Gibelman, M. (Eds.). (2013) Essential Information for Thriving and Surviving in Agencies: Navigating Human Service Organizations (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: Lyceum Books, INC. Chapter 4. McRae, M. B., & Short, E. L. (2009). Racial and cultural dynamics in group and organizational life: Crossing boundaries. Sage. Chapter 7. Jones, K., & Okun, T. (2001). White supremacy culture. Dismantling Racism: A Workbook for Social Change. Week 6: The Work Environment ➢ Organizational culture and climate ➢ Leadership styles ➢ Job satisfaction and burnout This unit relates to course objectives: 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 Required Readings: Furman, R., & Gibelman, M. (Eds.). (2013) Essential Information for Thriving and Surviving in Agencies: Navigating Human Service Organizations (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: Lyceum Books, INC. Chapter 6. **note this is out of sequence Esaki, N. (2019). Trauma-responsive Organizational Cultures: How Safe and Supported do Employees Feel?. Human Service Organizations: Management, Leadership & Governance, 1-8 Jury, A., Thorburn, N., & Weatherall, R. (2018). Workers’ Constructions of the “Good” and “Bad” Advocate in a Domestic Violence Agency. Human Service Organizations: Management, Leadership & Governance, 42(3), 318-326 Week 7: Supervision ➢ The function of supervision ➢ Professional development ➢ Performance evaluations ➢ Vicarious trauma 13 This unit relates to course objectives: 3, 6, and 7 Required Readings: Furman, R., & Gibelman, M. (Eds.). (2013) Essential Information for Thriving and Surviving in Agencies: Navigating Human Service Organizations (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: Lyceum Books, INC. Chapter 5. Kulkarni, S., Bell, H., Hartman, J. L., & Herman-Smith, R. L. (2013). Exploring individual and organizational factors contributing to compassion satisfaction, secondary traumatic stress, and burnout in domestic violence service providers. Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research, 4(2), 114-130. Lusk, M., Terrazas, S., & Salcido, R. (2017). Critical cultural competence in social work supervision. Human Service Organizations: Management, Leadership & Governance, 41(5), 464-476. Shanok, R. S. (1992). The supervisory relationship: Integrator, resource, and guide. Learning through supervision and mentorship, 37-41. Week 8: Social Work Practice in Host Settings ➢ Challenges and role incongruity This unit relates to course objectives: 3, 4, 5, 5a, and 7 Required Readings: Furman, R., & Gibelman, M. (Eds.). (2013) Essential Information for Thriving and Surviving in Agencies: Navigating Human Service Organizations (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: Lyceum Books, INC. Chapter 7. Beddoe, L. (2017). Managing identity in a host setting: School social workers' strategies for better interprofessional work in New Zealand schools. Qualitative Social Work, 1473325017747961. Moe, J. L., & Sparkman, N. M. (2015). Assessing service providers at LGBTQ-affirming community agencies on their perceptions of training needs and barriers to service. Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services, 27(3), 350-370. Week 9: Conditions of Work ➢ Organizational policies ➢ Laws that govern work This unit relates to course objectives: 3 and 4 Required Readings: Furman, R., & Gibelman, M. (Eds.). (2013) Essential Information for Thriving and Surviving in Agencies: Navigating Human Service Organizations (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: Lyceum Books, INC. Chapter 8. 14 Kim, H., & Zakour, M. (2018). Exploring the factors associated with the disaster preparedness of human service organizations serving persons with disabilities. Human Service Organizations: Management, Leadership & Governance, 42(1), 19-32 Week 10: The Changing Environment of Organizations and Internal Sources of Organizational Change ➢ Changing public policies ➢ Data driven solutions ➢ Turnover and restructure ➢ New initiatives ➢ Evidence based practice This unit relates to course objectives: 2, 4, 5 and 5a Required Readings: Furman, R., & Gibelman, M. (Eds.). (2013) Essential Information for Thriving and Surviving in Agencies: Navigating Human Service Organizations (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: Lyceum Books, INC. Chapter 9 and 10. Lynch-Cerullo, K., & Cooney, K. (2011). Moving from outputs to outcomes: A review of the evolution of performance measurement in the human service nonprofit sector. Administration in Social Work, 35(4), 364-388. Mosley, J. E., Marwell, N. P., & Ybarra, M. (2019). How the “what works” movement is failing human service organizations, and what social work can do to fix it. Human Service Organizations: Management, Leadership & Governance, 43(4), 326-335. Rojas, Y., & Stenström, N. (2019). The Effect of Organizational Factors on the Use of Evidence-based Practices among Middle Managers in Swedish Social Services. Human Service Organizations: Management, Leadership & Governance, 1-15. Week 11: Coping with Change – Making Your Organization Better ➢ Strength based approach ➢ Collaboration at work ➢ Building skills This unit relates to course objectives: 3, 4, 6 and 7 Required Readings: Furman, R., & Gibelman, M. (Eds.). (2013) Essential Information for Thriving and Surviving in Agencies: Navigating Human Service Organizations (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: Lyceum Books, INC. Chapters 11 and 12. Tafvelin, S., Keisu, B. I., & Kvist, E. (2019). The Prevalence and Consequences of Intragroup Conflicts for Employee Well-Being in Women-Dominated Work. Human Service Organizations: Management, Leadership & Governance, 1-16. 15 Woodford, M. R., & Preston, S. (2011). Developing a strategy to meaningfully engage stakeholders in program/policy planning: A guide for human services managers and practitioners. Journal of Community Practice, 19(2), 159-174. Week 12: In Class Group Work (mandatory attendance) Week 13: Final Presentations Week 14: Final Presentations 16 ASSIGNMENT DETAILS Assignment details are listed below. Students are expected to provide an electronic or printed copy at the beginning of class on the due date. Written work will be graded on content and clarity. Re-read the instructions to be sure that you are turning in a paper that meets the assignment criteria. While grammar and spell check are helpful, it is always best to find a live person to proofread your paper and provide feedback. ASSIGNMENT #1: Reflection Paper (10%) due week 3 This assignment aims to meet Course Objectives 1 and 3. Instructions: Write a 3-4-page paper on a time when you encountered/interfaced with a social service agency whether for yourself, a family member, a friend or other person that you know. ● What type of agency was it? ● What was that experience like, and did the experience meet expectations? ● Was there a feeling of respect, compassion, and support? In what way(s) did this come across? If not, in what way(s) did that come across? ● Did you think the services offered were useful and relevant to the issue they were attempting to address? ● Would you recommend this agency to someone you cared about? ● If you were auditing this agency, what changes would you propose be made to make it better for people seeking services from them? ASSIGNMENT #2: Midterm Paper (30%) due Week 7 This assignment aims to meet Course Objectives 1-7. Instructions: In a 6-8 pages, write a paper (using APA style) about a social service program that is doing work that you find interesting. Select your program early and schedule a time to interview someone who works in a capacity that could answer the questions below. In your interview, be sure to distinguish between the parent agency and their programs. For example: New York University (parent) and Silver School of Social Work – BSW (program). Use the information obtained in your interview, class readings and discussions to critically examine the program. Write an organizational analysis and answer 3 of the 6 questions below: ● If you were able to secure additional funding, how would you use it to build on the strengths (or unmet needs) of the program? ● What political forces/policies might (further) impact the work that your program does, and how might the program need to adapt to continue to provide support? ● How might the location and/or inclusion-exclusion criteria be expanded upon to provide additional support to individuals and communities? ● If you were in charge of this program, what changes would you make to promote the sharing of power and inclusion across stakeholders? ● How is institutional and structural racism upheld in policies, procedures, and practices within the program and what changes would you recommend to dismantle these structures to promote social justice and equity. Suggested interview questions: ● What is the agency’s mission and how do they aim to fulfill it? ● What is the organizational structure of the agency – who works there; who is on the board, who are 17 the executives, managers? ● Who funds the agency or program? ● What is the culture of the organization and how is it reinforced? ● What are the depth and breadth of their services - who do they help? ● Which population does your agency target and why – what is the inclusion and exclusion criteria for services? ● What are the problems that the agency is looking to address? ● Are there specific social welfare or political policies that make their work easier or harder? ● Where is the parent agency located, and where are their programs located – does this impact their services? ● How does the agency define “success” in working with their clients – what is a good outcome? ● What other agencies might they need to collaborate/partner with to support individuals, groups and communities? ● What are a few of the biggest challenges that the agency is facing right now, and what are they doing to address them? ● How does the agency address issues related to race and oppression, within the organization and with the people and communities that they work with? ● Who are the decision makers in the organization – who determines, policies, procedures and protocols and who is at that table? ● How are staff hired, trained, supported, developed? Assignments will all be graded on conceptual clarity, responsiveness to the assignment, and use of the literature. This assignment is asking that students think critically and creatively based on what we have learned so far. Integrate at least 4 of the course readings (required textbook is considered one source) that relate to the agency you have chosen. Academic or scholarly work requires a reference page. There are many reasons why citing your sources is important, and you must cite them in order to avoid plagiarism. It is acceptable to use online sources (e.g. New York Times, organizational websites, etc.), but these also need to be cited. Agency websites are helpful – but please be sure to properly cite all information. ASSIGNMENT #3 - Final Exam Group Presentation (35%) due Week 13 This assignment aims to meet Course Objectives 1-7. Instructions: In groups of 2-3 identify a social problem that you feel strongly about and that you all feel is not being addressed well. Then, design a program to fulfill this unmet need. All groups are required to submit a Powerpoint and reference page prior to the presentation date. Integrate at least 6 of the articles from the course readings that relate to the agency you are creating to support your rationale. Presentations should be 15-20 minutes long, ensuring equal time for each group member to share a portion of the overall project. Use the questions below as a guide: Outline the issue: ● What are the major social welfare policy issues related to this social problem? ● What types of social agencies are currently attempting to address this issue – and what is lacking? ● What are the current assumptions underlying the services/interventions to address this problem? Propose an agency to address this problem – be creative! 18 ● What is the agency’s mission and how do they aim to fulfill it? ● What is the organizational structure of the agency – who works there; who is on the board, who are the executives, managers and front line staff? Include an organizational chart. ● Who are the decision makers in the organization – who determines, policies, procedures and protocols and who is at that table? ● Who funds the agency or program and how will it be obtained? ● What are the depth and breadth of services provided - -how often? ● Which population are you targeting and why – inclusion and exclusion criteria? ● What are the underlying assumptions/values of this organization with respect to the problem that you are seeking to address? ● What is the culture of your organization and how are the cultural values created and reinforced? ● Are there specific social welfare or political policies that you anticipate will make your work easier or harder? ● What new knowledge, theories, research, policies or questions have informed your approach? ● What challenges would you anticipate in terms of securing sustainable funding and recruiting effective staff members? ● How are staff hired, trained, supported, developed? ● How will your agency address vicarious trauma? ● What other agencies might they need to collaborate/partner with to support individuals, groups and communities? ● How will your agency address issues related to race and oppression, within the organization and with the people and communities that they work with? ● How would prospective clients learn about the availability of your organization/intervention(s)? ● What will your agency do to support maximum access to your clients? ● How would you know that your organization/intervention has been effective in addressing the problem? ● How would you attempt to measure outcomes? Helpful Writing Resources: Please refer to Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th ed. or to NYU’s guide to APA-style citation here: http://nyu.libguides.com/apa Purdue OWL is also a great resource for writing and citation rules. https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/10/ If you need writing assistance: http://www.nyu.edu/cas/ewp/html/writing_center.html If you need help doing research: http://library.nyu.edu/ask/ 19 Engagement = Preparation + Participation ENGAGEMENT PREPARATION (outside of class) PARTICIPATION (in class) I am fully engaged Exemplary Preparation I read all assigned reading ahead of time. I research social, cultural, historic, economic, political connections to the text/topic to deepen my understanding of the weekly topic. I consider the course’s Learning Objectives and Competencies as I prepare. Animated Participation I attend class and I speak daily. Contributions in class reflect exceptional preparation. Ideas offered are always substantive, provide one or more major insights as well as direction for the class. Challenges are well substantiated and persuasively presented. If this person were not a member of the class, the quality of discussion would be diminished markedly I am occasionally engaged Novice Preparation I read assignments ahead of time. I do basic research to understand the material when needed, but I do not go beyond the obvious. Sometimes I consider the course’s Learning Objectives and Competencies as I prepare. Occasional Participation I attend class daily. I speak occasionally—mainly when called upon by the professor. Contributions in class reflect satisfactory preparation. Ideas offered are sometimes substantive, provide generally useful insights but seldom offer a new direction for the discussion. Challenges are sometimes presented, fairly well substantiated, and are sometimes persuasive. Sometimes I present general evidence to support my position. If this person were not a member of the class, the quality of discussion would be somewhat diminished. I’m not sure how to be engaged; I need some direction Inadequate preparation Sometimes I do the reading. I don’t research to understand the material, nor do I go beyond the obvious. Inadequate participation My attendance is inconsistent. I participate only when prompted. I am Disengaged No Preparation I do not read before class. No Participation My attendance is inconsistent. I do not speak in class.

 

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Reflection Paper: experience with a social welfare agency
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Reflection Paper: experience with a social welfare agency
Introduction
Social service agencies are an essential element in every society as they help in maintaining social cohesion in every aspect of community interaction. My encounter with social services was as an elementary school student in China. Child neglect cases due to poverty were common, which made child services a typical figure in the community. This phenomenon indicated the need for dedicated child services in the community to help the children. My first-hand interaction with a social service agency was a child service organization that came to help Kimberly Cho, a friend who was neglected and abused by her drunkard father. During the process, I answered questions about the victim and the changes they have undergone due to the abuse. The level of dedication needed to ensure effectiveness by the agent was the primary motivation for my pursuit of a social work career. This was due to the lack of the necessary infrastructure to serve the population. This essay describes the experience and emotional appeal realized from the interaction with the agency. The article further contains recommendations for bettering the level of services offered by the organization.

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