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Social Sciences
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Term Paper
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Final paper for a social work class Social Sciences Term Paper (Term Paper Sample)

Instructions:

This is a final paper for a social work major class, please make sure you are familiar with social work( social work is different from sociology)
I’ve attached the following:
1. Course syllabus
2. Past assignment for this class
3. Requirement for this final paper
Also, for the weekly reading of this course, we don’t have a textbook so all of the readings are article online, you can find most of them via google. If you want to read certain article but can’t access to it, please let me know and I can upload it.
This paper should be 7 pages not including reference page.
Please let me know if you have any questions! Thanks a lot

 

Final Social Media/Research Paper:
This assignment remains the same; the final paper is due on May 5th via email. You can write a traditional research paper or pick a real or imaginary social media platform/site and write an entry on topics related to social deviance and taboos for that site. The piece must be well-written and researched (with hyperlinks attached to academic studies or other reputable sources), compelling, and interesting. Think: Would this generate thoughtful conversations? What do I want people to do/know about X, Y, Z issues? What should be done politically about X, Y, Z issues?, etc. (Double-spaced, 12 size font, 6-7 pg, Word doc, references included)

 

Revised Syllabus 03.23.2020 Social Deviance and Taboos (Revised) Tuesday 4:55 - 6:35 PM 60 5th Ave, Rm C12, Washington Square Instructor: Assignments Attendance and class participation: Students are expected to attend all online classes on Zoom, to arrive on time, and be prepared to contribute to the group learning process. Participation can happen through orally by speaking or through the chat box by typing. You can also choose to opt out of the video option and participate through audio only or call-in. We might face some technical difficulties due to various, unforeseeable factors (Zoom itself, wifi connections, time zones, etc.), and it might be tricky to hold an online group discussion, but let us try our best and make adjustments as we move forward with this learning experience. 4 Reflection Papers: This assignment remains the same. You will submit a reflection paper based on the readings from one week’s session (doubleRevised Syllabus 03.23.2020 Social Deviance and Taboos (Revised) Tuesday 4:55 - 6:35 PM 60 5th Ave, Rm C12, Washington Square Instructor: Rosa Cho, PhD Email: rosajcho@nyu.edu or rac464@nyu.edu Office Hours: Tuesday, before or after class (by appointment) Assignments Attendance and class participation: Students are expected to attend all online classes on Zoom, to arrive on time, and be prepared to contribute to the group learning process. Participation can happen through orally by speaking or through the chat box by typing. You can also choose to opt out of the video option and participate through audio only or call-in. We might face some technical difficulties due to various, unforeseeable factors (Zoom itself, wifi connections, time zones, etc.), and it might be tricky to hold an online group discussion, but let us try our best and make adjustments as we move forward with this learning experience. 4 Reflection Papers: This assignment remains the same. You will submit a reflection paper based on the readings from one week’s session (doubleRevised Syllabus 03.23.2020 Social Deviance and Taboos (Revised) Tuesday 4:55 - 6:35 PM 60 5th Ave, Rm C12, Washington Square Instructor: Rosa Cho, PhD Email: rosajcho@nyu.edu or rac464@nyu.edu Office Hours: Tuesday, before or after class (by appointment) Assignments Attendance and class participation: Students are expected to attend all online classes on Zoom, to arrive on time, and be prepared to contribute to the group learning process. Participation can happen through orally by speaking or through the chat box by typing. You can also choose to opt out of the video option and participate through audio only or call-in. We might face some technical difficulties due to various, unforeseeable factors (Zoom itself, wifi connections, time zones, etc.), and it might be tricky to hold an online group discussion, but let us try our best and make adjustments as we move forward with this learning experience. 4 Reflection Papers: This assignment remains the same. You will submit a reflection paper based on the readings from one week’s session (doubleRevised Syllabus 03.23.2020 Social Deviance and Taboos (Revised) Tuesday 4:55 - 6:35 PM 60 5th Ave, Rm C12, Washington Square Instructor: Rosa Cho, PhD Email: rosajcho@nyu.edu or rac464@nyu.edu Office Hours: Tuesday, before or after class (by appointment) Assignments Attendance and class participation: Students are expected to attend all online classes on Zoom, to arrive on time, and be prepared to contribute to the group learning process. Participation can happen through orally by speaking or through the chat box by typing. You can also choose to opt out of the video option and participate through audio only or call-in. We might face some technical difficulties due to various, unforeseeable factors (Zoom itself, wifi connections, time zones, etc.), and it might be tricky to hold an online group discussion, but let us try our best and make adjustments as we move forward with this learning experience. 4 Reflection Papers: This assignment remains the same. You will submit a reflection paper based on the readings from one week’s session (doubleSDT Syllabus_SP 2020_Revised.doc.pdf 保存到 Dropbox • 2020年4⽉20⽇ 09:54 paper based on the readings from one week’s session (doublespaced, 12 size font, 2.5-3 pg, Word doc, APA style optional). They are due on the day of the session, and you will submit 4 entries in total this semester. Briefly identify the main ideas and perspectives and relate your reactions to your areas of academic or professional interests. Generally, students respond by exploring some of the following questions: new and/or challenging ideas presented by the readings; connections or conflicts; agree/like or disagree/dislike and why; application to field/future work experience, etc. Summary of Readings and Discussion Facilitation: This assignment remains the same; discussion leaders will present on Zoom. On a weekly basis, students will–independently or with classmates–present a summary of two (or more) of the required readings on theoretical concepts for that week. Students must post their summary a minimum of 24 hours prior to class. Summaries should be brief, a series of bullet points and brief commentary. Students presenting a summary should pose one or two discussion questions during this 10 - 13 minutes presentation. Final Social Media/Research Paper: This assignment remains the same; the final paper is due on May 5th via email. You can write a traditional research paper or pick a real or imaginary social media platform/site and write an entry on topics related to social deviance and taboos for that site. The piece must be well-written and researched (with hyperlinks attached to academic studies or other reputable sources), compelling, and interesting. Think: Would this generate thoughtful conversations? What do I want people to do/know about X, Y, Z issues? What should be done politically about X, Y, Z issues?, etc. (Double-spaced, 12 size font, 6-7 pg, Word doc, references included). paper based on the readings from one week’s session (doublespaced, 12 size font, 2.5-3 pg, Word doc, APA style optional). They are due on the day of the session, and you will submit 4 entries in total this semester. Briefly identify the main ideas and perspectives and relate your reactions to your areas of academic or professional interests. Generally, students respond by exploring some of the following questions: new and/or challenging ideas presented by the readings; connections or conflicts; agree/like or disagree/dislike and why; application to field/future work experience, etc. Summary of Readings and Discussion Facilitation: This assignment remains the same; discussion leaders will present on Zoom. On a weekly basis, students will–independently or with classmates–present a summary of two (or more) of the required readings on theoretical concepts for that week. Students must post their summary a minimum of 24 hours prior to class. Summaries should be brief, a series of bullet points and brief commentary. Students presenting a summary should pose one or two discussion questions during this 10 - 13 minutes presentation. Final Social Media/Research Paper: This assignment remains the same; the final paper is due on May 5th via email. You can write a traditional research paper or pick a real or imaginary social media platform/site and write an entry on topics related to social deviance and taboos for that site. The piece must be well-written and researched (with hyperlinks attached to academic studies or other reputable sources), compelling, and interesting. Think: Would this generate thoughtful conversations? What do I want people to do/know about X, Y, Z issues? What should be done politically about X, Y, Z issues?, etc. (Double-spaced, 12 size font, 6-7 pg, Word doc, references included). paper based on the readings from one week’s session (doublespaced, 12 size font, 2.5-3 pg, Word doc, APA style optional). They are due on the day of the session, and you will submit 4 entries in total this semester. Briefly identify the main ideas and perspectives and relate your reactions to your areas of academic or professional interests. Generally, students respond by exploring some of the following questions: new and/or challenging ideas presented by the readings; connections or conflicts; agree/like or disagree/dislike and why; application to field/future work experience, etc. Summary of Readings and Discussion Facilitation: This assignment remains the same; discussion leaders will present on Zoom. On a weekly basis, students will–independently or with classmates–present a summary of two (or more) of the required readings on theoretical concepts for that week. Students must post their summary a minimum of 24 hours prior to class. Summaries should be brief, a series of bullet points and brief commentary. Students presenting a summary should pose one or two discussion questions during this 10 - 13 minutes presentation. Final Social Media/Research Paper: This assignment remains the same; the final paper is due on May 5th via email. You can write a traditional research paper or pick a real or imaginary social media platform/site and write an entry on topics related to social deviance and taboos for that site. The piece must be well-written and researched (with hyperlinks attached to academic studies or other reputable sources), compelling, and interesting. Think: Would this generate thoughtful conversations? What do I want people to do/know about X, Y, Z issues? What should be done politically about X, Y, Z issues?, etc. (Double-spaced, 12 size font, 6-7 pg, Word doc, references included). paper based on the readings from one week’s session (doublespaced, 12 size font, 2.5-3 pg, Word doc, APA style optional). They are due on the day of the session, and you will submit 4 entries in total this semester. Briefly identify the main ideas and perspectives and relate your reactions to your areas of academic or professional interests. Generally, students respond by exploring some of the following questions: new and/or challenging ideas presented by the readings; connections or conflicts; agree/like or disagree/dislike and why; application to field/future work experience, etc. Summary of Readings and Discussion Facilitation: This assignment remains the same; discussion leaders will present on Zoom. On a weekly basis, students will–independently or with classmates–present a summary of two (or more) of the required readings on theoretical concepts for that week. Students must post their summary a minimum of 24 hours prior to class. Summaries should be brief, a series of bullet points and brief commentary. Students presenting a summary should pose one or two discussion questions during this 10 - 13 minutes presentation. Final Social Media/Research Paper: This assignment remains the same; the final paper is due on May 5th via email. You can write a traditional research paper or pick a real or imaginary social media platform/site and write an entry on topics related to social deviance and taboos for that site. The piece must be well-written and researched (with hyperlinks attached to academic studies or other reputable sources), compelling, and interesting. Think: Would this generate thoughtful conversations? What do I want people to do/know about X, Y, Z issues? What should be done politically about X, Y, Z issues?, etc. (Double-spaced, 12 size font, 6-7 pg, Word doc, references included). paper based on the readings from one week’s session (doublespaced, 12 size font, 2.5-3 pg, Word doc, APA style optional). They are due on the day of the session, and you will submit 4 entries in total this semester. Briefly identify the main ideas and perspectives and relate your reactions to your areas of academic or professional interests. Generally, students respond by exploring some of the following questions: new and/or challenging ideas presented by the readings; connections or conflicts; agree/like or disagree/dislike and why; application to field/future work experience, etc. Summary of Readings and Discussion Facilitation: This assignment remains the same; discussion leaders will present on Zoom. On a weekly basis, students will–independently or with classmates–present a summary of two (or more) of the required readings on theoretical concepts for that week. Students must post their summary a minimum of 24 hours prior to class. Summaries should be brief, a series of bullet points and brief commentary. Students presenting a summary should pose one or two discussion questions during this 10 - 13 minutes presentation. Final Social Media/Research Paper: This assignment remains the same; the final paper is due on May 5th via email. You can write a traditional research paper or pick a real or imaginary social media platform/site and write an entry on topics related to social deviance and taboos for that site. The piece must be well-written and researched (with hyperlinks attached to academic studies or other reputable sources), compelling, and interesting. Think: Would this generate thoughtful conversations? What do I want people to do/know about X, Y, Z issues? What should be done politically about X, Y, Z issues?, etc. (Double-spaced, 12 size font, 6-7 pg, Word doc, references included). paper based on the readings from one week’s session (doublespaced, 12 size font, 2.5-3 pg, Word doc, APA style optional). They are due on the day of the session, and you will submit 4 entries in total this semester. Briefly identify the main ideas and perspectives and relate your reactions to your areas of academic or professional interests. Generally, students respond by exploring some of the following questions: new and/or challenging ideas presented by the readings; connections or conflicts; agree/like or disagree/dislike and why; application to field/future work experience, etc. Summary of Readings and Discussion Facilitation: This assignment remains the same; discussion leaders will present on Zoom. On a weekly basis, students will–independently or with classmates–present a summary of two (or more) of the required readings on theoretical concepts for that week. Students must post their summary a minimum of 24 hours prior to class. Summaries should be brief, a series of bullet points and brief commentary. Students presenting a summary should pose one or two discussion questions during this 10 - 13 minutes presentation. Final Social Media/Research Paper: This assignment remains the same; the final paper is due on May 5th via email. You can write a traditional research paper or pick a real or imaginary social media platform/site and write an entry on topics related to social deviance and taboos for that site. The piece must be well-written and researched (with hyperlinks attached to academic studies or other reputable sources), compelling, and interesting. Think: Would this generate thoughtful conversations? What do I want people to do/know about X, Y, Z issues? What should be done politically about X, Y, Z issues?, etc. (Double-spaced, 12 size font, 6-7 pg, Word doc, references included). Book Review Presentation: In lieu of in-person presentations, students/groups will email their book review presentation materials to all students/instructor by May 5th. Students will review a book with a classmate(s) and jointly present it at the end of the semester. Presentation can be done utilizing any method comfortable for the students (oral, PowerPoint, Prezi, video clips, etc.). At minimum, this 10-15 minute presentation should describe: 1) major messages/lessons; 2) background of the book/author(s); 3) relevance to our understanding of deviance and taboos; 4) implication for social work or your professional/academic field. * Please refer to the original syllabus for the list of books and other memos in regard to grading. ** The “Shit happens” clause can still be used, if a student chooses to. Schedule of Classes Session/Date Topics Reading Session 8 Mar 24, 2020 Opening Dialogue • First virtual classroom and check-in • Open dialogue on connecting to theories/topics covered with current events Session 9 Mar 31, 2020 Theory: Social Learning and Control Theories • Hirschi & Gottfredson: “Social Control Theories” • Bauer & Tittle: “Social Learning Theory and Human Reinforcement” Read 2 articles of your choice: • Church, Jaggers, & Taylor: “Neighborhood, Poverty, and Negative Behavior: An Examination of Differential Association and Social Control Theory” • Zembroski: “Sociological Theories of Crime and Delinquency” • Kathleen Blee: “White Supremacy as Extreme Deviance” • Bradshaw: “A Rose by Any Other Name: State Criminality and the Limits of Social Learning Theory” • Saletan: “Situationist Ethics: The Stanford Prison Experiment Doesn’t Explain Abu Ghraib” Book Review Presentation: In lieu of in-person presentations, students/groups will email their book review presentation materials to all students/instructor by May 5th. Students will review a book with a classmate(s) and jointly present it at the end of the semester. Presentation can be done utilizing any method comfortable for the students (oral, PowerPoint, Prezi, video clips, etc.). At minimum, this 10-15 minute presentation should describe: 1) major messages/lessons; 2) background of the book/author(s); 3) relevance to our understanding of deviance and taboos; 4) implication for social work or your professional/academic field. * Please refer to the original syllabus for the list of books and other memos in regard to grading. ** The “Shit happens” clause can still be used, if a student chooses to. Schedule of Classes Session/Date Topics Reading Session 8 Mar 24, 2020 Opening Dialogue • First virtual classroom and check-in • Open dialogue on connecting to theories/topics covered with current events Session 9 Mar 31, 2020 Theory: Social Learning and Control Theories • Hirschi & Gottfredson: “Social Control Theories” • Bauer & Tittle: “Social Learning Theory and Human Reinforcement” Read 2 articles of your choice: • Church, Jaggers, & Taylor: “Neighborhood, Poverty, and Negative Behavior: An Examination of Differential Association and Social Control Theory” • Zembroski: “Sociological Theories of Crime and Delinquency” • Kathleen Blee: “White Supremacy as Extreme Deviance” • Bradshaw: “A Rose by Any Other Name: State Criminality and the Limits of Social Learning Theory” • Saletan: “Situationist Ethics: The Stanford Prison Experiment Doesn’t Explain Abu Ghraib” Book Review Presentation: In lieu of in-person presentations, students/groups will email their book review presentation materials to all students/instructor by May 5th. Students will review a book with a classmate(s) and jointly present it at the end of the semester. Presentation can be done utilizing any method comfortable for the students (oral, PowerPoint, Prezi, video clips, etc.). At minimum, this 10-15 minute presentation should describe: 1) major messages/lessons; 2) background of the book/author(s); 3) relevance to our understanding of deviance and taboos; 4) implication for social work or your professional/academic field. * Please refer to the original syllabus for the list of books and other memos in regard to grading. ** The “Shit happens” clause can still be used, if a student chooses to. Schedule of Classes Session/Date Topics Reading Session 8 Mar 24, 2020 Opening Dialogue • First virtual classroom and check-in • Open dialogue on connecting to theories/topics covered with current events Session 9 Mar 31, 2020 Theory: Social Learning and Control Theories • Hirschi & Gottfredson: “Social Control Theories” • Bauer & Tittle: “Social Learning Theory and Human Reinforcement” Read 2 articles of your choice: • Church, Jaggers, & Taylor: “Neighborhood, Poverty, and Negative Behavior: An Examination of Differential Association and Social Control Theory” • Zembroski: “Sociological Theories of Crime and Delinquency” • Kathleen Blee: “White Supremacy as Extreme Deviance” • Bradshaw: “A Rose by Any Other Name: State Criminality and the Limits of Social Learning Theory” • Saletan: “Situationist Ethics: The Stanford Prison Experiment Doesn’t Explain Abu Ghraib” Book Review Presentation: In lieu of in-person presentations, students/groups will email their book review presentation materials to all students/instructor by May 5th. Students will review a book with a classmate(s) and jointly present it at the end of the semester. Presentation can be done utilizing any method comfortable for the students (oral, PowerPoint, Prezi, video clips, etc.). At minimum, this 10-15 minute presentation should describe: 1) major messages/lessons; 2) background of the book/author(s); 3) relevance to our understanding of deviance and taboos; 4) implication for social work or your professional/academic field. * Please refer to the original syllabus for the list of books and other memos in regard to grading. ** The “Shit happens” clause can still be used, if a student chooses to. Schedule of Classes Session/Date Topics Reading Session 8 Mar 24, 2020 Opening Dialogue • First virtual classroom and check-in • Open dialogue on connecting to theories/topics covered with current events Session 9 Mar 31, 2020 Theory: Social Learning and Control Theories • Hirschi & Gottfredson: “Social Control Theories” • Bauer & Tittle: “Social Learning Theory and Human Reinforcement” Read 2 articles of your choice: • Church, Jaggers, & Taylor: “Neighborhood, Poverty, and Negative Behavior: An Examination of Differential Association and Social Control Theory” • Zembroski: “Sociological Theories of Crime and Delinquency” • Kathleen Blee: “White Supremacy as Extreme Deviance” • Bradshaw: “A Rose by Any Other Name: State Criminality and the Limits of Social Learning Theory” • Saletan: “Situationist Ethics: The Stanford Prison Experiment Doesn’t Explain Abu Ghraib” Session 10 Apr 7, 2020 Theories: Constructionist theory, Labeling theory Topic: Vice Careers • Best: “The Constructionist Stance” and/or • Hamlin: “Labeling Theory” Read 3 articles of your choice: • Reinarman, “The Social Construction of Drug Scarce” • Admunson, Zajicek, & Hunt: “Pathologies of the Poor: What Do the War on Drugs and Welfare Reform Have in Common?” • Karandinos: “Cashing in on Despair” • Reinarman & Levine: “Crack in Context: Politics and Media in the Making of a Drug Scare” • Reinarman & Levine: “Crack in the Rearview Mirror: Deconstructing Drug War Mythology” • ACLU: Report: “The War on Marijuana in Black and White” • Sampson & Raudenbush: “Seeing Disorder: Neighborhood Stigma and the Social Construction of ‘Broken Windows’” • Levine: “The Secret of Worldwide Drug Prohibition: The Varieties and Uses of Drug Prohibition” • Murphy & Venkatesh: “Vice Careers: The Changing Contours of Sex Work in New York City” • Sebag-Montefiore: “Male Escorts” • Merriam: “An American Summer: On Running a DC Brothel” • Calida: “They Think They Have a PhD in Whoreology: ‘How Lobbying for Sex Worker Rights Helps Educate Us All” Session 11 Apr 14, 2020 Theories: Feminist theories • Butler: “For White Girls Only?: Postfeminism and the Politics of Inclusion” • Fernandes: “Unsettling ‘Third Wave Feminism’: Feminist Waves, Intersectionality, and Identity Politics in Retrospect” Read 2-3 articles of your choice: • Hernandez & Wallace: “Nicki Minaj and Pretty Taking All Fades: Performing the Erotics of Feminist Solidarity” • Smith: “’Or a Real, Real Bad Lesbian’: Nicki Minaj and the Acknowledgement of Queer Desire in Hip-Hop Culture” • Allen: “Unpacking Transphobia in Feminism” • Connell: “Transsexual Women and Feminist Thought: Toward New Understanding and New Politics” • Rogers: “The Invention of the Heterosexual” Recommended: • Blaustein: “Bangladesh’s Third Gender” • Boylorn: “The Bold and Beautiful Possibilities of a Transgender Storyline on Daytime” • Padawer: “What’s So Bad about A Boy Who Wants to Wear a Dress?” Session 10 Apr 7, 2020 Theories: Constructionist theory, Labeling theory Topic: Vice Careers • Best: “The Constructionist Stance” and/or • Hamlin: “Labeling Theory” Read 3 articles of your choice: • Reinarman, “The Social Construction of Drug Scarce” • Admunson, Zajicek, & Hunt: “Pathologies of the Poor: What Do the War on Drugs and Welfare Reform Have in Common?” • Karandinos: “Cashing in on Despair” • Reinarman & Levine: “Crack in Context: Politics and Media in the Making of a Drug Scare” • Reinarman & Levine: “Crack in the Rearview Mirror: Deconstructing Drug War Mythology” • ACLU: Report: “The War on Marijuana in Black and White” • Sampson & Raudenbush: “Seeing Disorder: Neighborhood Stigma and the Social Construction of ‘Broken Windows’” • Levine: “The Secret of Worldwide Drug Prohibition: The Varieties and Uses of Drug Prohibition” • Murphy & Venkatesh: “Vice Careers: The Changing Contours of Sex Work in New York City” • Sebag-Montefiore: “Male Escorts” • Merriam: “An American Summer: On Running a DC Brothel” • Calida: “They Think They Have a PhD in Whoreology: ‘How Lobbying for Sex Worker Rights Helps Educate Us All” Session 11 Apr 14, 2020 Theories: Feminist theories • Butler: “For White Girls Only?: Postfeminism and the Politics of Inclusion” • Fernandes: “Unsettling ‘Third Wave Feminism’: Feminist Waves, Intersectionality, and Identity Politics in Retrospect” Read 2-3 articles of your choice: • Hernandez & Wallace: “Nicki Minaj and Pretty Taking All Fades: Performing the Erotics of Feminist Solidarity” • Smith: “’Or a Real, Real Bad Lesbian’: Nicki Minaj and the Acknowledgement of Queer Desire in Hip-Hop Culture” • Allen: “Unpacking Transphobia in Feminism” • Connell: “Transsexual Women and Feminist Thought: Toward New Understanding and New Politics” • Rogers: “The Invention of the Heterosexual” Recommended: • Blaustein: “Bangladesh’s Third Gender” • Boylorn: “The Bold and Beautiful Possibilities of a Transgender Storyline on Daytime” • Padawer: “What’s So Bad about A Boy Who Wants to Wear a Dress?” Session 10 Apr 7, 2020 Theories: Constructionist theory, Labeling theory Topic: Vice Careers • Best: “The Constructionist Stance” and/or • Hamlin: “Labeling Theory” Read 3 articles of your choice: • Reinarman, “The Social Construction of Drug Scarce” • Admunson, Zajicek, & Hunt: “Pathologies of the Poor: What Do the War on Drugs and Welfare Reform Have in Common?” • Karandinos: “Cashing in on Despair” • Reinarman & Levine: “Crack in Context: Politics and Media in the Making of a Drug Scare” • Reinarman & Levine: “Crack in the Rearview Mirror: Deconstructing Drug War Mythology” • ACLU: Report: “The War on Marijuana in Black and White” • Sampson & Raudenbush: “Seeing Disorder: Neighborhood Stigma and the Social Construction of ‘Broken Windows’” • Levine: “The Secret of Worldwide Drug Prohibition: The Varieties and Uses of Drug Prohibition” • Murphy & Venkatesh: “Vice Careers: The Changing Contours of Sex Work in New York City” • Sebag-Montefiore: “Male Escorts” • Merriam: “An American Summer: On Running a DC Brothel” • Calida: “They Think They Have a PhD in Whoreology: ‘How Lobbying for Sex Worker Rights Helps Educate Us All” Session 11 Apr 14, 2020 Theories: Feminist theories • Butler: “For White Girls Only?: Postfeminism and the Politics of Inclusion” • Fernandes: “Unsettling ‘Third Wave Feminism’: Feminist Waves, Intersectionality, and Identity Politics in Retrospect” Read 2-3 articles of your choice: • Hernandez & Wallace: “Nicki Minaj and Pretty Taking All Fades: Performing the Erotics of Feminist Solidarity” • Smith: “’Or a Real, Real Bad Lesbian’: Nicki Minaj and the Acknowledgement of Queer Desire in Hip-Hop Culture” • Allen: “Unpacking Transphobia in Feminism” • Connell: “Transsexual Women and Feminist Thought: Toward New Understanding and New Politics” • Rogers: “The Invention of the Heterosexual” Recommended: • Blaustein: “Bangladesh’s Third Gender” • Boylorn: “The Bold and Beautiful Possibilities of a Transgender Storyline on Daytime” • Padawer: “What’s So Bad about A Boy Who Wants to Wear a Dress?” Session 10 Apr 7, 2020 Theories: Constructionist theory, Labeling theory Topic: Vice Careers • Best: “The Constructionist Stance” and/or • Hamlin: “Labeling Theory” Read 3 articles of your choice: • Reinarman, “The Social Construction of Drug Scarce” • Admunson, Zajicek, & Hunt: “Pathologies of the Poor: What Do the War on Drugs and Welfare Reform Have in Common?” • Karandinos: “Cashing in on Despair” • Reinarman & Levine: “Crack in Context: Politics and Media in the Making of a Drug Scare” • Reinarman & Levine: “Crack in the Rearview Mirror: Deconstructing Drug War Mythology” • ACLU: Report: “The War on Marijuana in Black and White” • Sampson & Raudenbush: “Seeing Disorder: Neighborhood Stigma and the Social Construction of ‘Broken Windows’” • Levine: “The Secret of Worldwide Drug Prohibition: The Varieties and Uses of Drug Prohibition” • Murphy & Venkatesh: “Vice Careers: The Changing Contours of Sex Work in New York City” • Sebag-Montefiore: “Male Escorts” • Merriam: “An American Summer: On Running a DC Brothel” • Calida: “They Think They Have a PhD in Whoreology: ‘How Lobbying for Sex Worker Rights Helps Educate Us All” Session 11 Apr 14, 2020 Theories: Feminist theories • Butler: “For White Girls Only?: Postfeminism and the Politics of Inclusion” • Fernandes: “Unsettling ‘Third Wave Feminism’: Feminist Waves, Intersectionality, and Identity Politics in Retrospect” Read 2-3 articles of your choice: • Hernandez & Wallace: “Nicki Minaj and Pretty Taking All Fades: Performing the Erotics of Feminist Solidarity” • Smith: “’Or a Real, Real Bad Lesbian’: Nicki Minaj and the Acknowledgement of Queer Desire in Hip-Hop Culture” • Allen: “Unpacking Transphobia in Feminism” • Connell: “Transsexual Women and Feminist Thought: Toward New Understanding and New Politics” • Rogers: “The Invention of the Heterosexual” Recommended: • Blaustein: “Bangladesh’s Third Gender” • Boylorn: “The Bold and Beautiful Possibilities of a Transgender Storyline on Daytime” • Padawer: “What’s So Bad about A Boy Who Wants to Wear a Dress?” Session 10 Apr 7, 2020 Theories: Constructionist theory, Labeling theory Topic: Vice Careers • Best: “The Constructionist Stance” and/or • Hamlin: “Labeling Theory” Read 3 articles of your choice: • Reinarman, “The Social Construction of Drug Scarce” • Admunson, Zajicek, & Hunt: “Pathologies of the Poor: What Do the War on Drugs and Welfare Reform Have in Common?” • Karandinos: “Cashing in on Despair” • Reinarman & Levine: “Crack in Context: Politics and Media in the Making of a Drug Scare” • Reinarman & Levine: “Crack in the Rearview Mirror: Deconstructing Drug War Mythology” • ACLU: Report: “The War on Marijuana in Black and White” • Sampson & Raudenbush: “Seeing Disorder: Neighborhood Stigma and the Social Construction of ‘Broken Windows’” • Levine: “The Secret of Worldwide Drug Prohibition: The Varieties and Uses of Drug Prohibition” • Murphy & Venkatesh: “Vice Careers: The Changing Contours of Sex Work in New York City” • Sebag-Montefiore: “Male Escorts” • Merriam: “An American Summer: On Running a DC Brothel” • Calida: “They Think They Have a PhD in Whoreology: ‘How Lobbying for Sex Worker Rights Helps Educate Us All” Session 11 Apr 14, 2020 Theories: Feminist theories • Butler: “For White Girls Only?: Postfeminism and the Politics of Inclusion” • Fernandes: “Unsettling ‘Third Wave Feminism’: Feminist Waves, Intersectionality, and Identity Politics in Retrospect” Read 2-3 articles of your choice: • Hernandez & Wallace: “Nicki Minaj and Pretty Taking All Fades: Performing the Erotics of Feminist Solidarity” • Smith: “’Or a Real, Real Bad Lesbian’: Nicki Minaj and the Acknowledgement of Queer Desire in Hip-Hop Culture” • Allen: “Unpacking Transphobia in Feminism” • Connell: “Transsexual Women and Feminist Thought: Toward New Understanding and New Politics” • Rogers: “The Invention of the Heterosexual” Recommended: • Blaustein: “Bangladesh’s Third Gender” • Boylorn: “The Bold and Beautiful Possibilities of a Transgender Storyline on Daytime” • Padawer: “What’s So Bad about A Boy Who Wants to Wear a Dress?” Session 10 Apr 7, 2020 Theories: Constructionist theory, Labeling theory Topic: Vice Careers • Best: “The Constructionist Stance” and/or • Hamlin: “Labeling Theory” Read 3 articles of your choice: • Reinarman, “The Social Construction of Drug Scarce” • Admunson, Zajicek, & Hunt: “Pathologies of the Poor: What Do the War on Drugs and Welfare Reform Have in Common?” • Karandinos: “Cashing in on Despair” • Reinarman & Levine: “Crack in Context: Politics and Media in the Making of a Drug Scare” • Reinarman & Levine: “Crack in the Rearview Mirror: Deconstructing Drug War Mythology” • ACLU: Report: “The War on Marijuana in Black and White” • Sampson & Raudenbush: “Seeing Disorder: Neighborhood Stigma and the Social Construction of ‘Broken Windows’” • Levine: “The Secret of Worldwide Drug Prohibition: The Varieties and Uses of Drug Prohibition” • Murphy & Venkatesh: “Vice Careers: The Changing Contours of Sex Work in New York City” • Sebag-Montefiore: “Male Escorts” • Merriam: “An American Summer: On Running a DC Brothel” • Calida: “They Think They Have a PhD in Whoreology: ‘How Lobbying for Sex Worker Rights Helps Educate Us All” Session 11 Apr 14, 2020 Theories: Feminist theories • Butler: “For White Girls Only?: Postfeminism and the Politics of Inclusion” • Fernandes: “Unsettling ‘Third Wave Feminism’: Feminist Waves, Intersectionality, and Identity Politics in Retrospect” Read 2-3 articles of your choice: • Hernandez & Wallace: “Nicki Minaj and Pretty Taking All Fades: Performing the Erotics of Feminist Solidarity” • Smith: “’Or a Real, Real Bad Lesbian’: Nicki Minaj and the Acknowledgement of Queer Desire in Hip-Hop Culture” • Allen: “Unpacking Transphobia in Feminism” • Connell: “Transsexual Women and Feminist Thought: Toward New Understanding and New Politics” • Rogers: “The Invention of the Heterosexual” Recommended: • Blaustein: “Bangladesh’s Third Gender” • Boylorn: “The Bold and Beautiful Possibilities of a Transgender Storyline on Daytime” • Padawer: “What’s So Bad about A Boy Who Wants to Wear a Dress?” Session 12 Apr 21, 2020 Moral Panic and Crusades • Cohen: “Whose Side Were We On? The Undeclared Politics of Moral Panic Theory” Read 3 articles of your choice: • Weitzer: “The Social Construction of Sex Trafficking: Ideology and institutionalization of a Moral Crusade” • Waldron: “Cyberbullying: The Social Construction of a Moral Panic” • Jenkins: “Failure to Launch: Why Do Some Social Issues Fail to Detonate Moral Panic?” • Marcus et al.: “Conflict and Agency Among Sex Workers and Pimps: A Closer Look at Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking” • Markey & Ferguson: “Teaching us to Fear: The Violent Video Game Moral Panic and the Politics of Game Research” Session 13 Apr 28, 2020 Policy and Practice Implications Read 4 articles of your choice: • Chunn: “Welfare Law, Welfare Fraud, and the Moral Regulation of the ‘Never Deserving’ Poor” • Goldberg: “Economic Inequality and Economic Crisis: A Challenge for Social Workers” • Flaherty: “Saviors” believe that they are better than the people they are “saving” • Hobbes: “Stop Trying to Save the World” • Giridharadas: “The New Elite’s Phoney Crusade to Save the World –Without Changing Anything” • Bickford: “’We All Like to Think We’ve Saved Somebody’: Sex Trafficking in Literature” Recommended: • Ferguson & Markey: “Please Stop Resurrecting the Moral Panic Over Video Games and School Shootings” • Law: “How savior mentality stands in the way of solidarity organizing: An interview with Jordan Flaherty” • Crabapple: “Special Prostitution Courts and the Myths of ‘Rescuing’ Sex Workers” Session 14 May 5, 2019 Closing Dialogue • Last virtual classroom and closing dialogue • Book Review Presentations due via email • Final Paper due via email 11 Session 12 Apr 21, 2020 Moral Panic and Crusades • Cohen: “Whose Side Were We On? The Undeclared Politics of Moral Panic Theory” Read 3 articles of your choice: • Weitzer: “The Social Construction of Sex Trafficking: Ideology and institutionalization of a Moral Crusade” • Waldron: “Cyberbullying: The Social Construction of a Moral Panic” • Jenkins: “Failure to Launch: Why Do Some Social Issues Fail to Detonate Moral Panic?” • Marcus et al.: “Conflict and Agency Among Sex Workers and Pimps: A Closer Look at Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking” • Markey & Ferguson: “Teaching us to Fear: The Violent Video Game Moral Panic and the Politics of Game Research” Session 13 Apr 28, 2020 Policy and Practice Implications Read 4 articles of your choice: • Chunn: “Welfare Law, Welfare Fraud, and the Moral Regulation of the ‘Never Deserving’ Poor” • Goldberg: “Economic Inequality and Economic Crisis: A Challenge for Social Workers” • Flaherty: “Saviors” believe that they are better than the people they are “saving” • Hobbes: “Stop Trying to Save the World” • Giridharadas: “The New Elite’s Phoney Crusade to Save the World –Without Changing Anything” • Bickford: “’We All Like to Think We’ve Saved Somebody’: Sex Trafficking in Literature” Recommended: • Ferguson & Markey: “Please Stop Resurrecting the Moral Panic Over Video Games and School Shootings” • Law: “How savior mentality stands in the way of solidarity organizing: An interview with Jordan Flaherty” • Crabapple: “Special Prostitution Courts and the Myths of ‘Rescuing’ Sex Workers” Session 14 May 5, 2019 Closing Dialogue • Last virtual classroom and closing dialogue • Book Review Presentations due via email • Final Paper due via email 11 Session 12 Apr 21, 2020 Moral Panic and Crusades • Cohen: “Whose Side Were We On? The Undeclared Politics of Moral Panic Theory” Read 3 articles of your choice: • Weitzer: “The Social Construction of Sex Trafficking: Ideology and institutionalization of a Moral Crusade” • Waldron: “Cyberbullying: The Social Construction of a Moral Panic” • Jenkins: “Failure to Launch: Why Do Some Social Issues Fail to Detonate Moral Panic?” • Marcus et al.: “Conflict and Agency Among Sex Workers and Pimps: A Closer Look at Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking” • Markey & Ferguson: “Teaching us to Fear: The Violent Video Game Moral Panic and the Politics of Game Research” Session 13 Apr 28, 2020 Policy and Practice Implications Read 4 articles of your choice: • Chunn: “Welfare Law, Welfare Fraud, and the Moral Regulation of the ‘Never Deserving’ Poor” • Goldberg: “Economic Inequality and Economic Crisis: A Challenge for Social Workers” • Flaherty: “Saviors” believe that they are better than the people they are “saving” • Hobbes: “Stop Trying to Save the World” • Giridharadas: “The New Elite’s Phoney Crusade to Save the World –Without Changing Anything” • Bickford: “’We All Like to Think We’ve Saved Somebody’: Sex Trafficking in Literature” Recommended: • Ferguson & Markey: “Please Stop Resurrecting the Moral Panic Over Video Games and School Shootings” • Law: “How savior mentality stands in the way of solidarity organizing: An interview with Jordan Flaherty” • Crabapple: “Special Prostitution Courts and the Myths of ‘Rescuing’ Sex Workers” Session 14 May 5, 2019 Closing Dialogue • Last virtual classroom and closing dialogue • Book Review Presentations due via email • Final Paper due via email 11 Session 12 Apr 21, 2020 Moral Panic and Crusades • Cohen: “Whose Side Were We On? The Undeclared Politics of Moral Panic Theory” Read 3 articles of your choice: • Weitzer: “The Social Construction of Sex Trafficking: Ideology and institutionalization of a Moral Crusade” • Waldron: “Cyberbullying: The Social Construction of a Moral Panic” • Jenkins: “Failure to Launch: Why Do Some Social Issues Fail to Detonate Moral Panic?” • Marcus et al.: “Conflict and Agency Among Sex Workers and Pimps: A Closer Look at Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking” • Markey & Ferguson: “Teaching us to Fear: The Violent Video Game Moral Panic and the Politics of Game Research” Session 13 Apr 28, 2020 Policy and Practice Implications Read 4 articles of your choice: • Chunn: “Welfare Law, Welfare Fraud, and the Moral Regulation of the ‘Never Deserving’ Poor” • Goldberg: “Economic Inequality and Economic Crisis: A Challenge for Social Workers” • Flaherty: “Saviors” believe that they are better than the people they are “saving” • Hobbes: “Stop Trying to Save the World” • Giridharadas: “The New Elite’s Phoney Crusade to Save the World –Without Changing Anything” • Bickford: “’We All Like to Think We’ve Saved Somebody’: Sex Trafficking in Literature” Recommended: • Ferguson & Markey: “Please Stop Resurrecting the Moral Panic Over Video Games and School Shootings” • Law: “How savior mentality stands in the way of solidarity organizing: An interview with Jordan Flaherty” • Crabapple: “Special Prostitution Courts and the Myths of ‘Rescuing’ Sex Workers” Session 14 May 5, 2019 Closing Dialogue • Last virtual classroom and closing dialogue • Book Review Presentations due via email • Final Paper due via email 11

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Sexual Deviance: Rape
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Sexual Deviance: Rape
There are various forms of social deviance categorized by their causing factors and the coded or informal laws they break. Sexual deviance is one of the formal forms of deviance and refers to the non-conforming sexual behaviour to societal expectations and affects the individual functioning of the victims (Paulauskas, 2013). Rape is the extreme of sexual deviance due to its effects and can be studied as a criminal, psychological and sexual behaviour. According to uniform crime reporting (UCR) (2013), rape is the penetration, regardless of its slightness, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object or the oral penetration by a sex organ of another person without the victim’s consent. Despite the implementation of various intervention programs, rape is still prevalent in the American with more than 20% cases orchestrated by juveniles (Paulauskas, 2013). Millions of Americans are at risk of rape as its prevalence is estimated at more than 430, 000 victims annually (Rainn, 2020). Rape affects both genders as 1.4%, and 18.3% of men and women respectively have experienced rape at one point during their lifetime (NSVRC, 2018). In 2015 more than 25.5 million women and 2.8 million men had reported having experienced rape with the threshold age being 25 for both genders (NSVRC, 2018). Rainn (2020) noted other variants apart gender that affects the perpetration of rape, including race and ethnicity, sexuality, prisons and military camps. 2018 recorded more than 734, 000 rape cases, although reporting the cases to police has been declining from 40 to 25% in 2017 (NSVRC, 2018). Understanding the causing factors of rape as deviant behaviour can help in the intervention programs to reduce not only its prevalence but also increase its reporting. Analyzing the causality factors can help in gauging the effectiveness of the already-in-place programs as well as proposing new ways to mitigate it.

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