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1 page/≈275 words
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Level:
Chicago
Subject:
Communications & Media
Type:
Research Proposal
Language:
English (U.S.)
Document:
MS Word
Date:
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Topic:

Research question and primary source worksheet. Research Proposal (Research Proposal Sample)

Instructions:

It will consist of a completed Primary Source Analysis Worksheet, a high quality research question, and a brief (50 to 100 word) explanation of the research question.
link to Primary Source: https://youtu(dot)be/k8R7MukHImA

 

HISTORY OF COMMUNICATION
CMST 3HC3
WINTER 2020 
Assignment 1: Research question and primary source worksheet
Description from the Syllabus
Assignment 1: Research question and primary source worksheet (5% of final grade)
This is the first in a series of three linked assignments for this course. It will consist of a completed Primary Source Analysis Worksheet, a high quality research question, and a brief (50 to 100 word) explanation of the research question. To complete this assignment, you will need to select a document from one of the primary source collections linked on Avenue. (If you would like to work with other primary sources, please speak with the instructor during office hours.) Complete a Primary Source Analysis worksheet for your chosen primary source. Then, develop a research question addressing a historical aspect of your chosen primary source. Write a short explanation of how you arrived at your research question and how you might go about answering it by using other primary, as well as secondary, sources. We will cover how to develop a good historical research question and how to analyze a primary source in lecture and tutorial. For more information on this assignment, please see the guidelines on Avenue. Electronic submission is due to the Avenue Dropbox by noon on Friday, 31 January; a hard copy of the assignment with a printout of the rubric attached is due at the start of your tutorial during the week of 3 February.
Objectives
The aim of this assignment is for you to develop your critical thinking and research skills by a) beginning to analyze and interpret primary sources (available on Avenue) and b) developing a good historical research question based on historical evidence. 
Instructions
Part I: Analysis of primary sources
In this section, you will use the primary source analysis skills that you explored in tutorial. You will be using the primary source you select to develop a research question that you will be researching for the next two assignments, so be sure to choose something that sparks your interest and curiosity.
1. Spend some time looking at the primary source groupings on Avenue (Content: Assignments: Primary Sources). Watch the video pertaining to the collection you have chosen. 
If you would like to select documents not included in the collections provided on Avenue, please contact the instructor via email (and/or office hours) for permission. You are welcome to search for documents following the suggestions on the Primary Sources guidelines (available on Avenue with the materials for Assignment 2). 
2. Select one collection and review all of the documents in it. 
3. Select one primary source document from your chosen collection and conduct an initial analysis of your chosen primary sources, using the “CMST 3HC3 Primary Source Analysis Worksheet” available on Avenue.
4. Attach the completed worksheet after the page with the research question and other requested information.
Part II: Formulating a research question 
1. Write down the name of the collection that you selected.
2. Then, provide a BIBLIOGRAPHIC citation of the primary source you analyzed, following the Chicago Manual of Style. 
3. Underneath the bibliographic entry, add 1–2 sentences describing the document. Identify things like the title, artist/author, dates, locations, and (if possible) the probable audience.
4. Following the guidelines set out in the “How to Write a Research Question” information sheet and discussed in class, formulate a good quality historical research question about what you observe in the primary source that you analyzed. Be sure that your question is historical in nature (e.g., “how was radio depicted as beneficial to rural listeners in the 1930s?” NOT “what are the differences between rural and urban radio audiences?”). In formulating your question, you are welcome to draw upon course readings, discussion, and your own interests.
5. In 60–100 words, explain how you arrived at your research question and how you might go about answering it. Be sure to address a) how your research question relates to the primary source you analysed (and possibly its document group); b) how you developed a question with a historical focus; and c) how you plan to use other primary sources, as well as secondary sources, to answer your question. 
Hints
1. Give yourself plenty of time to explore the available primary sources, as well as to select and think about the one you choose to analyze.
2. Look ahead at course readings that may help you better understand your chosen primary source. You may even wish to do some preliminary secondary source research. This will also prepare you to do well at assignments 2 and 3.
3. The more care you put into formulating your research question for assignment 1, the better prepared you will be for assignments 2 and 3.
4. Read your brief description and explanation aloud to yourself. This is a good way to catch silly mistakes and infelicitous turns of phrase.
Evaluation: This assignment is worth 5% of the final course mark. Here is the breakdown for evaluation (out of 100%):
10% Assembly and formatting 
Are name, student number, course number, tutorial section, and TA name in upper right hand corner? 
Are all of the required elements included in the following order: part II (name of document group, bibliographic citation for the chosen primary source, 1–2 sentences describing the document, research question, brief explanation of research question), part I (“Primary Source Analysis Worksheet”) 
is the assignment formatted in double-spaced, 12-point Times New Roman font, left justified, 1-inch margins? 
Is a printout of the rubric attached securely to the back of the hard copy submission? (Please take care of this before you come to class: staplers or paperclips will NOT be available in tutorials.) (NOTE: please do not submit a copy of the rubric electronically)
Is the electronic submission in Word or PDF format? Has it been submitted without the rubric? 
10% Spelling, grammar, quality of prose, and citation style
Do the part II description, research question, and explanation use proper spelling and punctuation?
Do the part II description, research question, and explanation use proper grammar, including no run-on sentences or sentence fragments?
Is the prose clear and easy to understand? Does it avoid wordiness, awkward phrases, and other barriers to comprehensibility?
Are the description and explanation the correct length? 
Does the primary source citation follow Chicago Manual of Style guidelines for bibliographic citations? Does the bibliographic entry use hanging indents?
Part I 
20% “Primary Source Analysis Worksheet”
Has the worksheet been filled with a high attention to detail and as completely as possible (given the early stage of research)?
Part II 
30% Research question (for a fuller explication of these questions, consult the “How to Write a Research Question” information sheet) 
Is it historical?
Is the question clear?
Is the question focused?
Is it appropriately complex?
Does it demonstrate familiarity with the document group that you named? 
30% Explanation of research question 
Does it how your research question relates to the primary source you analysed (and, if relevant, its document group)?
Does it explain how you developed a question with a historical focus?
Does it explain how you expect to use other primary sources, as well as secondary sources, to answer your question?
 

source..
Content:

Name
student number
course number
tutorial section
TA name
Part II: name of document group (SARS)
Bibliography
Ali, Amina and Youngalil, Rachelle. “In-depth: SARS Research.” Last modified August 14, 2003. https://www.cbc.ca/news2/background/sars/research.html.
The document was published by CBC News Online about researching the characteristics of SARS in August 14, 2004, including isolation, culturing, and sequencing as well as the possible modes for transmission of the SARS. Additionally, the document presented possible theories about the outbreak of SARS to different countries and the possible origin of the virus.

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